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‘Hours of heavy wind and rain to go,’ stay off roads until Michael passes, Gov. Roy Cooper says

Flooding closes Capital Boulevard in downtown Raleigh

Raleigh police officers A.S. Freese and B.S. Smith set flares to funnel traffic off N. McDowell Street at West Lane St. as rain from the remnants of Hurricane Michael close Capital Boulevard in and out of downtown Raleigh, Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018.
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Raleigh police officers A.S. Freese and B.S. Smith set flares to funnel traffic off N. McDowell Street at West Lane St. as rain from the remnants of Hurricane Michael close Capital Boulevard in and out of downtown Raleigh, Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018.

River and street flooding, fallen trees and the threat of tornadoes spread across North Carolina on Thursday as Michael forged a path through the state, prompting the governor to urge people to avoid travel until the storm clears the area tonight and tomorrow.

One death is being linked to the storm in North Carolina. Gov. Roy Cooper said in a Thursday evening press conference that a man died when a tree fell on a car in Iredell County.

More than 100 roads had been shut down because of flooding and downed trees, in addition to 75 roads still closed because of Hurricane Florence, Cooper and the N.C. Department of Transportation announced in a Thursday evening press conference, warning people to stay off the roads.

Ray Castillo captured the Broad River raging over its banks in the Bat Cave, NC area and the Hickory Nut Gorge Campground area.



“Central and Eastern North Carolina have several more hours of heavy wind and rain to go,” Cooper said. “As night falls, please don’t go out unless you have to. Travel conditions are difficult in areas. Don’t drive on flooded roads if you must go out.”

As of 4 p.m., the North Carolina Highway Patrol had responded to 450 collisions and 780 calls for service and officials asked that people not call 911 unless it is an emergency.

Watch the ABC11 weather forecast for the latest on the development of Hurricane Michael and its impact on North Carolina.



There were “dozens” of water rescues and evacuations on Thursday, many in the mountain counties of Henderson and McDowell, Cooper said.

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper warns of flooding and the danger of high winds across the state as the remnants of Hurricane Michael move through the area Friday, Oct. 11, 2018.



Much of the state was under flash flood or tornado watches or warnings, Division of Emergency Management Director Mike Sprayberry said. More than 6 inches of rain had already fallen in the western part of the state as of Thursday morning, Cooper said.

A raccoon refused to give up when rushing floodwater trapped it on a rock near Crabtree Creek in Raleigh as the remnants of Hurricane Michael passed through the Triangle on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018.

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“Tonight I urge people to hunker down and stay safe until Michael blows through,” Cooper said Thursday evening.

Major flooding is expected on the Haw River and moderate flooding on the Tar and Rocky rivers on Thursday and Friday.

There were hundreds of thousands of power outages in the state, and crews began to repair them Thursday.

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