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Kerrick juror says retrial would be futile

Kerrick attorneys talk about mistrial

Defense attorneys George Laughrun and Michael Greene speak about the recent mistrial of Randall "Wes" Kerrick. Video by David T. Foster - dfoster@charlotteobserver.com
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Defense attorneys George Laughrun and Michael Greene speak about the recent mistrial of Randall "Wes" Kerrick. Video by David T. Foster - dfoster@charlotteobserver.com

Absent new evidence, it will be futile to retry Charlotte-Mecklenburg police Officer Randall “Wes” Kerrick, says a juror in Kerrick’s mistrial.

“Unless you have new evidence to present,” said the juror, “you are going to come up with the same thing,” a deadlocked jury.

She is the fourth juror who has spoken publicly about the trial, and the second to decline to disclose her vote. The jury foreman, Bruce Raffe, told the Observer that of the eight jurors who favored acquitting Kerrick in the shooting death of Jonathan Ferrell, one was black, one Hispanic and six white. Of the four favoring conviction, two were black, one Hispanic and one white.

Raffe said he believed Kerrick was not guilty. Moses Wilson, 67, the jury’s only African-American male, voted to convict. Another juror interviewed this past weekend would not say how she voted but said: “I feel bad that as a jury we could not come together one way or the other for the families.”

The female juror interviewed Tuesday said the jury repeatedly examined all of the evidence, hoping to discover something that would lead to consensus on Kerrick’s innocence or guilt in the shooting death of 24-year-old Ferrell.

In the end, she said, it came down to the police dashcam video. It shows Ferrell walking toward Kerrick and two other police officers, then running off-camera in Kerrick’s direction before Kerrick shot him 10 times.

We never bought the story that (Ferrell) was a thug, or up to no good, or anything like that.

Female juror in Kerrick mistrial

“Was he asking for help? Or was he charging to attack?” the juror asked. “He’s not here to tell us, unfortunately. We don’t know.”

The juror agreed to be interviewed only if she wasn’t identified, citing tensions around the trial’s outcome. She would not disclose how she voted. She said she did not intend to tell her own children.

She said the trial left her so emotionally drained and distraught that she only read news accounts Monday, three days after the jury was dismissed.

She said that as a mother she needed to make it clear that no juror believed the negative characterizations of Ferrell presented by Kerrick’s attorneys.

“It pains me for (Ferrell’s) mother. I have children. We never bought the story that (Ferrell) was a thug, or up to no good, or anything like that. I get emotional just thinking about it.”

The juror said deliberations were emotional. She recalled raised voices and some tears.

But in the end, she said, everyone parted with respect for each other. “I was very impressed with the quality of the jurors.”

She said she felt bad for both families. The Ferrells lost a son. Randall Kerrick “went to work that day and his life changed forever. There were no winners.”

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