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NASCAR opposes HB2, chairman says

Brian France, NASCAR chairman & CEO, talks to reporters at a news conference on Nov. 20, 2015. France said Friday that “we take the position that any discrimination, unintended or not, we do not like that and we are working behind the scenes, and we are not a political institution.”
Brian France, NASCAR chairman & CEO, talks to reporters at a news conference on Nov. 20, 2015. France said Friday that “we take the position that any discrimination, unintended or not, we do not like that and we are working behind the scenes, and we are not a political institution.” AP

NASCAR is the latest organization to announce its opposition to North Carolina’s House Bill 2.

Chairman Brian France told the Associated Press Sports Editors this week that the racing body opposes the law that limits legal protections for LGBT individuals. Gov. Pat McCrory signed the law March 23.

“We take the position that any discrimination, unintended or not, we do not like that and we are working behind the scenes, and we are not a political institution,” France said. “We don’t set agendas or write laws but we express our values to policy makers. We will and we do. We are real clear about that.”

NASCAR, based in Daytona Beach, Fla., has offices in uptown Charlotte and Concord.

“We try to be part of a solution, not a bunch a threats truthfully; but we are very direct and we do our civic part,” said France. “We like to think we take a lot of out of communities and run events and do business in North Carolina and so when asked to put back into these communities and be part of big and small decisions, we want to be there, but we are one small piece of the fabric. We want to play our role but not overstate our role.”

Among other things, HB2 requires transgender people in public facilities in North Carolina to use the restroom that corresponds to the gender on their birth certificate. David Scott

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