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Supreme Court's gun ban ruling not expected to affect Carolinas

The U.S. Supreme Court ruling Thursday on the District of Columbia's handgun ban was a landmark ruling on gun rights that emboldened gun owners and infuriated gun-control advocates nationwide.

But people on both sides agreed the decision won't change much in the Carolinas.

“That ruling only deals with D.C. and will have zero effect on us,” said John Bruskill, who manages Firepower Inc., a gun shop and shooting range in Matthews. “Our existing laws will remain unchanged.”

The National Rifle Association plans to use the Supreme Court ruling to challenge handgun bans in San Francisco and Chicago, NRA spokeswoman Ashley Varner said Thursday.

But the Carolinas have no such bans. They allow most people to obtain handgun permits after background checks and for concealed handguns under limited circumstances. The Carolinas are neither the most nor least restrictive gun control states, Varner said.

The states do prohibit gun ownership by criminals, drug users and mental patients – people Justice Antonin Scalia specifically said in the Supreme Court ruling still should not be allowed to carry guns.

Scalia, writing for the majority, said the ruling also does not undercut “longstanding prohibitions” on guns in schools and government buildings.

The N.C. Attorney General's Office, which would defend any legal challenge to state gun laws, was reviewing the Supreme Court ruling to see if it would have any effect on N.C. law, said spokeswoman Noelle Talley. She said she knows of no planned challenges based on the ruling.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruling Thursday on the District of Columbia's handgun ban was a landmark ruling on gun rights that emboldened gun owners and infuriated gun-control advocates nationwide.

But people on both sides agreed the decision won't change much in the Carolinas.

“That ruling only deals with D.C. and will have zero effect on us,” said John Bruskill, who manages Firepower Inc., a gun shop and shooting range in Matthews. “Our existing laws will remain unchanged.”

The National Rifle Association plans to use the Supreme Court ruling to challenge handgun bans in San Francisco and Chicago, NRA spokeswoman Ashley Varner said Thursday.

But the Carolinas have no such bans. They allow most people to obtain handgun permits after background checks and for concealed handguns under limited circumstances. The Carolinas are neither the most nor least restrictive gun control states, Varner said.

The states do prohibit gun ownership by criminals, drug users and mental patients – people Justice Antonin Scalia specifically said in the Supreme Court ruling still should not be allowed to carry guns.

Scalia, writing for the majority, said the ruling also does not undercut “longstanding prohibitions” on guns in schools and government buildings.

The N.C. Attorney General's Office, which would defend any legal challenge to state gun laws, was reviewing the Supreme Court ruling to see if it would have any effect on N.C. law, said spokeswoman Noelle Talley. She said she knows of no planned challenges based on the ruling.

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