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These bitter cold temps aren’t going away anytime soon

Watch boiling water turn to snow

As freezing temperatures have settled across across much of the northern U.S. this week, a new trend has emerged. More people are trying an experiment where they throw boiling water into freezing air, resulting in a sparkling cloud of snow.
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As freezing temperatures have settled across across much of the northern U.S. this week, a new trend has emerged. More people are trying an experiment where they throw boiling water into freezing air, resulting in a sparkling cloud of snow.

Bitter cold will remain in Charlotte for the next week, and the National Weather Service warned Monday that pipes may freeze. It also reminded people to make sure generators are well-ventilated to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning.

The low for Monday night and into Tuesday morning is expected to be 13 degrees, and the high Tuesday is forecast to be 33 degrees. The low for Tuesday night is forecast to be 18, and Wednesday’s high is projected to be 39 degrees.

Temperatures are then projected to drop again.

The lows for Thursday morning and Friday morning are expected to be around 15 degrees.

The highs are forecast to be just above freezing until Sunday, when the high is expected to be a seemingly balmy 41 degrees.

No precipitation is forecast until Monday, when rain might hit the area.

Other areas in the Carolinas might see snow this week.

A few inches could fall in Charleston and Myrtle Beach on Wednesday, according to the National Weather Service. Depending on how the storm tracks, more snow could fall, or those areas might get hit with sleet and freezing rain.

In the Charlotte area, the National Weather Service said this week’s cold temperatures will “likely result in high demand for electricity across the region” and that “power outages may result from the heavy electrical load.”

The weather service also said people should allow water to drip through their pipes to keep them from freezing. It also said people should make sure their pets and livestock have water that will not freeze, and that they have a warm place for shelter.

Charlotte’s record low for the first week of January was 5 degrees, set in 1924.

Steve Harrison: 704-358-5160, @Sharrison_Obs

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