Charlie Bost raised 13 children with his wife, Mary, and was the last local African-American farmer to use mule power, Bell and Blue. Local historian Mitch Simpson says Bost grew up near the Old Phoenix Mine, now Green Oaks Golf Course, and there were numerous African-American farmers in the area. He remembers that his family rented land from Jim Bost, who was born a slave. As the story goes, Bost was the second husband of Rosa Reid Bost whose first husband had a deadly encounter with a mule. Over time, she accumulated several hundred acres of land in the county.
Charlie Bost raised 13 children with his wife, Mary, and was the last local African-American farmer to use mule power, Bell and Blue. Local historian Mitch Simpson says Bost grew up near the Old Phoenix Mine, now Green Oaks Golf Course, and there were numerous African-American farmers in the area. He remembers that his family rented land from Jim Bost, who was born a slave. As the story goes, Bost was the second husband of Rosa Reid Bost whose first husband had a deadly encounter with a mule. Over time, she accumulated several hundred acres of land in the county. COURTESY OF MITCH SIMPSON
Charlie Bost raised 13 children with his wife, Mary, and was the last local African-American farmer to use mule power, Bell and Blue. Local historian Mitch Simpson says Bost grew up near the Old Phoenix Mine, now Green Oaks Golf Course, and there were numerous African-American farmers in the area. He remembers that his family rented land from Jim Bost, who was born a slave. As the story goes, Bost was the second husband of Rosa Reid Bost whose first husband had a deadly encounter with a mule. Over time, she accumulated several hundred acres of land in the county. COURTESY OF MITCH SIMPSON

Cabarrus County collecting stories of African-American farmers

March 29, 2015 08:00 AM