Cabarrus

Cub Scout day camp builds confidence, teaches skills

Tiger Cub parent Jennifer Dibernardo, right in red shirt, walks on the dock as the scouts fish the pond at Camp Cabarrus.
Tiger Cub parent Jennifer Dibernardo, right in red shirt, walks on the dock as the scouts fish the pond at Camp Cabarrus. Marty Price

Despite the temperatures rising through the 90s, AJ Feimster, 11, stepped up to the bow resting in the sun as fellow Scouts opted to pick those in the shade.

AJ said he struggled on the archery range the day before, but seemed sure of what he needed to do as he stepped up to the firing line.

When his first shot hit the blue ring, two rings from the bull’s-eye, AJ relaxed and fired his four remaining arrows in rapid succession, hitting the target each time. He didn’t get a bull’s-eye, but was close enough to score 31 points – his highest ever.

“Yesterday was really hard because the arrows were bouncing off the target. These hay targets are easier and we all seem to have better aim today,” he said.

AJ was attending the first week of the 23rd annual Cabarrus Cub Scout day camp at Camp Cabarrus, in Kannapolis. The volunteer staff continued the tradition of training young Cub Scouts on skills needed to become Boy Scouts. From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 15-19 and June 22-26, more than 180 scouts came to Camp Cabarrus for scouting fun.

At the BB gun range a group of Scouts could be heard shouting, “I got a bull’s-eye, I got a bull’s-eye,“ proving their practice had paid off. Concord’s River Lewis, 7, puffed out his chest and exclaimed, “I got two bull’s-eyes!” as he pointed to the holes in his target.

There were other stations teaching woodworking, making survival bracelets and other skills they would need to become Boy Scouts.

To many of them, fishing with worms and corn is the highlight of the camp. “Look, there is a fish looking at mine,” said Joey Martino, 7, as he dipped his rod toward the water surface.

“No, he is looking at mine,” said Nathan Hall, 7, as he pushed his rod forward, crossing their lines. As the two boys lifted their rods, their lines tangled, everyone had a good laugh, realizing that catching each other may be the only thing “hooked” that morning.

Marty Price is a freelance writer. Have a story idea for Marty? Email him at martyprice53@gmail.com

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