South Charlotte

Recent heavy rain causes wall to collapse in Mint Hill

The recent rains contributed to the collapse of the head wall framing the culvert that runs under Beaver Dam Lane in Mint Hill’s Farmwood neighborhood
The recent rains contributed to the collapse of the head wall framing the culvert that runs under Beaver Dam Lane in Mint Hill’s Farmwood neighborhood

Recent heavy rain has caused big problems for one Mint Hill street. The head wall (the block wall surrounding the culvert) on one side of Beaver Dam Lane in the Farmwood subdivison collapsed Monday night.

The concrete blocks broke free of the dirt bank and tumbled into Irvins Creek. Public safety officials closed the road until daylight when they could inspect the damage.

Mint Hill town manager Brian Welch said officials opened the road Tuesday morning, but barricaded that side to keep vehicles away from the crumbling dirt.

Welch said the culvert under Beaver Dam has been on the town’s replacement list for a while. This latest incident has moved it to the head of the line.

“It’s been a situation that we knew we had to address. We knew the pipe was misshapened and compressed, and occasionally the road would flood. Now it has to be fixed,” Welch said.

Mint Hill commissioners were expected to approve a design contract Thursday evening to draw up plans for culvert replacement.

Welch said those plans could take awhile since a number of agencies including Mecklenburg County, North Carolina Department of Environmental and Natural Resources and the Army Corps of Engineers have to sign off on the documents because the creek is involved.

During construction the road will be closed, but Welch said Farmwood was built with a number of connecting streets so no house will be completely cut off.

“While the road is closed folks will be inconvenienced, but no one will have to go more that a few minutes out of their way,” Welch said.

Once plans are complete, construction will begin and should take about eight weeks with some inclement weather days factored in.

Welch estimates the project will cost $200,000-$300,000. He said the project will be funded through the town’s stormwater fund, money collected through Mecklenburg County stormwater fees and returned back to the towns for stormwater projects.

Melinda Johnston is a freelance writer: m.johnston@carolina.rr.com.

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