South Charlotte

Town enacts a pavement cut policy to protect roads

Pavement patches, such as this one on Zelda Lane, are becoming more common as development continues in Matthews. A new pavement cut policy recently approved by Matthews Commissioners will collect fees from contractors who disturb the pavement.
Pavement patches, such as this one on Zelda Lane, are becoming more common as development continues in Matthews. A new pavement cut policy recently approved by Matthews Commissioners will collect fees from contractors who disturb the pavement.

Matthews commissioners recently approved a new policy that will help protect town-maintained roads from the damage caused by contractors and utility companies working on lines under the pavement.

“We are looking forward to having additional procedures in place to maintain and improve the integrity of our roadways,” said Matthews Public Works Director C.J. O’Neill.

On the recommendation of O’Neill, the board voted unanimously to approve the pavement cut policy that will go into effect July 1.

Contractors and utility workers frequently make cuts in the pavement to install, repair, replace or extend their lines. Even though they patch the road when work is complete, O’Neill said the cuts significantly shorten the life of the pavement that then has to be repaired by the town.

Under the new policy, all utility companies or contractors performing utility excavations within the roadway must obtain a Street Cut Permit from the Public Works Department. To receive the permit, the applicant must also have Charlotte Department of Transportation Utility Cut Certification, which can be obtained by passing a CDOT class.

Once the cut is made and the utility work completed, a public works employee will inspect the area prior to patching to make sure it is properly backfilled. A pavement degradation fee also will be assessed to the contractor for the impact of the cut on the roadway. The amount of the fee will depend on the type and length of the cut.

The City of Charlotte adopted a similar policy in 2007, and several other municipalities statewide also have implemented pavement cut policies and pavement degradation fees.

O’Neill said the new pavement degradation fee would bring in at least $15,000 a year, which will go to maintenance of the 100 miles of town roads.

For more information about the new policy, call the Matthews Public Works department, 704-847-3640.

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