South Charlotte

Coretta Robinson

Former NBC6 traffic reporter Coretta Robinson is now a personal trainer and fitness class instructor.

Robinson, who lives in Steele Creek with her husband and two daughters, takes her strength classes and fitness camps to various gyms and neighborhood sites throughout southern Mecklenburg.

Robinson, who turns 40 this month, talked with Neighbors of Southern Mecklenburg about making the switch from familiar TV face to fitness expert. Her remarks are edited for brevity. Celeste Smith

Are you still on television? I have been gone since November 2006. I have had absolutely no connection with broadcasting. I was at J.T. Williams Middle School for two years, teaching seventh-grade language arts. I will be at Alexander Graham Middle School this year.

I saw a man in the grocery store the other day. He said, “I've wondered where you had gone. I watched you every morning, I saw you in the helicopter.” People stop and talk and chat and they want to know what I'm doing now. It still makes me feel appreciated.

How did you move from broadcasting to fitness? It was (anchor) Colleen Odegaard. She had this idea (in 2000) that we could enter this half marathon and be a group and train together, and come across the finish line together as a group. I had never run a day in my life – I was a cheerleader. Running had never been something I ever wanted to do. It was unbelievable to actually complete it. And I kept running. I would come home from work at noon, I'd have my change of clothes in the kitchen so I wouldn't go to bed, and run an hour and a half every day.

My husband and I worked out in the garage every day. Then when they opened the Steele Creek Y, I started attending there. I got certified to teach fitness classes, and then I got certified to teach indoor cycling. Then I got certified as a personal trainer.

What do you teach? In the neighborhoods where I work, I have worked with most of the residents for some time, so those classes are more advanced. I teach a strength class with hand weights at the Fort Mill Y. Starting Monday, I'm supposed to have two days a week at Highway 521 Recreation Center. I call it a fitness camp. I'm afraid to use boot camp. The idea is to come and get in shape. It's movement, it's cardio, using your own body weight for strength and for sculpting, along with hand weights and bands, and flexibility and endurance.

I'm looking for registrants as we speak. People can register at www.exercise-matters .com (Robinson's Web site.)

Do you suspect people take classes because they recognize you? Charlotte is so ever-changing, with so many new people, especially in the neighborhoods I work at. Some people I've met never knew I was on TV.

What's your favorite workout? My favorite workout includes:

three sets of 12 slow squats with barbell

40 military push-ups or more

one-minute floor jacks (performed with hands and balls of feet on the floor, with the legs moving out in separate directions and back together.)

one-minute mountain climbers (placing hands and balls of feet on the floor, alternately pull each knee to the chest while keeping your hand on the floor.)

one-minute jumping jacks (with ankle bands as resistance)

four-minute rope series

V sit-ups, keeping both head and feet off ground (as many as possible)

(Repeat entire series two times.)

Former NBC6 traffic reporter Coretta Robinson is now a personal trainer and fitness class instructor.

Robinson, who lives in Steele Creek with her husband and two daughters, takes her strength classes and fitness camps to various gyms and neighborhood sites throughout southern Mecklenburg.

Robinson, who turns 40 this month, talked with Neighbors of Southern Mecklenburg about making the switch from familiar TV face to fitness expert. Her remarks are edited for brevity. Celeste Smith

Are you still on television? I have been gone since November 2006. I have had absolutely no connection with broadcasting. I was at J.T. Williams Middle School for two years, teaching seventh-grade language arts. I will be at Alexander Graham Middle School this year.

I saw a man in the grocery store the other day. He said, “I've wondered where you had gone. I watched you every morning, I saw you in the helicopter.” People stop and talk and chat and they want to know what I'm doing now. It still makes me feel appreciated.

How did you move from broadcasting to fitness? It was (anchor) Colleen Odegaard. She had this idea (in 2000) that we could enter this half marathon and be a group and train together, and come across the finish line together as a group. I had never run a day in my life – I was a cheerleader. Running had never been something I ever wanted to do. It was unbelievable to actually complete it. And I kept running. I would come home from work at noon, I'd have my change of clothes in the kitchen so I wouldn't go to bed, and run an hour and a half every day.

My husband and I worked out in the garage every day. Then when they opened the Steele Creek Y, I started attending there. I got certified to teach fitness classes, and then I got certified to teach indoor cycling. Then I got certified as a personal trainer.

What do you teach? In the neighborhoods where I work, I have worked with most of the residents for some time, so those classes are more advanced. I teach a strength class with hand weights at the Fort Mill Y. Starting Monday, I'm supposed to have two days a week at Highway 521 Recreation Center. I call it a fitness camp. I'm afraid to use boot camp. The idea is to come and get in shape. It's movement, it's cardio, using your own body weight for strength and for sculpting, along with hand weights and bands, and flexibility and endurance.

I'm looking for registrants as we speak. People can register at www.exercise-matters .com (Robinson's Web site.)

Do you suspect people take classes because they recognize you? Charlotte is so ever-changing, with so many new people, especially in the neighborhoods I work at. Some people I've met never knew I was on TV.

What's your favorite workout? My favorite workout includes:

three sets of 12 slow squats with barbell

40 military push-ups or more

one-minute floor jacks (performed with hands and balls of feet on the floor, with the legs moving out in separate directions and back together.)

one-minute mountain climbers (placing hands and balls of feet on the floor, alternately pull each knee to the chest while keeping your hand on the floor.)

one-minute jumping jacks (with ankle bands as resistance)

four-minute rope series

V sit-ups, keeping both head and feet off ground (as many as possible)

(Repeat entire series two times.)

  Comments