Union County

Expect more amenities at Crooked Creek Park

Children enjoy what the town calls a destination playground, shaded in the trees and keeping to the woodland theme with swings and two climbing structures with slides.
Children enjoy what the town calls a destination playground, shaded in the trees and keeping to the woodland theme with swings and two climbing structures with slides. CRYSTAL O’GORMAN

Crooked Creek Park has more amenities in the works for Indian Trail residents.

Parks and Recreation Director Jason Tryon said several projects would be completed between now and spring at the park, which is at 5900 Oakwood Lane near Sardis Elementary School and Unionville-Indian Trail Road.

The town’s first dog park will open at Crooked Creek in mid-November. It stands on almost 2 acres of gated park space divided into two sections for small and large dogs. Mike Parks, Indian Trail communications coordinator, said residents must register their dogs with the town before they are eligible for key card entry.

An 18-hole disc golf course also has been approved by the town and construction will start on the first nine holes over the winter.

Tryon said Indian Trail Parks and Recreation applied for a state grant called PARTIS through North Carolina Parks and Recreation Trust Fund to pay for the other nine holes and construction of an interactive splash pad, an outdoor fitness park with exercise equipment and develop an additional half-mile of walking trails. They will find out more about grant approval in the coming months.

The town also approved funding for the following amenities which will be completed by spring: electronic security gate, two bocce courts, three concrete cornhole sets, two additional shade shelters and extra picnic tables.

Crooked Creek has developed 35 out of its 140 available acres. The park opened in May with four baseball/softball fields; a 30,000-square-foot concession area, scores tower and administrative offices building in the middle of the fields.

Tryon said more than 24,000 people have visited the park and the fields are booked with the majority being local baseball and softball teams.

“Having a park in town does a variety of things for residents such as improving quality of life and providing a place to meet and enjoy the outdoors,” he said. “We’ve done a lot, but we are just getting started.”

The department has begun planning programs and events that cater to diverse groups in the community. The programs will be advertised and implemented next year.

Crystal O’Gorman is a freelance writer: crystalogormanwrites@gmail.com.

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