North Carolina

Are you sick of drowning in sweat? Cooler temperatures finally will arrive this week

Staying safe in hot temperatures

Some parts of the country are seeing dangerously high temperatures and as the mercury rises, so does the risk of heat-related illness. An emergency department doctor has tips on how to stay safe in the heat.
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Some parts of the country are seeing dangerously high temperatures and as the mercury rises, so does the risk of heat-related illness. An emergency department doctor has tips on how to stay safe in the heat.

If you’re over this hot weather in the Carolinas, forecasters have some good news for you.

North and South Carolina have been gripped by a seemingly endless oppressive heat wave that’s stretched across much of the East Coast.

Right now, parts of North Carolina are under an excessive heat warning, while other parts of the state and parts of South Carolina are under a heat advisory, according to the National Weather Service.

It’s so hot that the city of Durham closed its outdoor public pools on Sunday afternoon, the parks and recreation department tweeted.

But it looks like there’s going to be a reprieve soon.

In North Carolina, temperatures were in the upper 90s on Sunday in many areas, with heat indexes reaching over 100, the NWS said.

Those temperatures won’t let up on Monday, but highs are expected to drop to the upper-80s by Tuesday and mid-80s by Wednesday, the NWS said.

But by Saturday temperatures will climb back into the upper-80s and low-90s in some areas of the state.

In South Carolina, temperatures were in the low-to-mid 90s on Sunday, with apparent temperatures reaching into the 100s, according to the National Weather Service.

Like North Carolina, the state will see cooler weather as the week goes on.

Highs in some areas will be in the low-90s on Tuesday but will drop to the mid-80s on Wednesday, while some areas could see highs as cool as 79 degrees, the NWS said.

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Bailey Aldridge is a reporter covering real-time news in North and South Carolina. She has a degree in journalism from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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