Letters to the Editor

Leave the power with the people to elect N.C. judges

Van Hoy
Van Hoy

Leave choosing judges to the people

In response to “Should N.C. continue to elect judges?” (June 26):

Chief Justice Mark Martin of the N.C. Supreme Court is widely admired and respected, but he has it wrong in urging the so-called “merit” selection of state court judges. The proposed selection panels could include some combination of lawyers and appointees of the General Assembly.

Selection by appointees of the General Assembly would consolidate power within the legislative branch, and thus disrupt the checks and balances among the three branches of government. Selection by or influenced by lawyers would have the foxes guarding the hen house.

Would you rather have judges chosen by voters, or instead by a few people with partisan and economic interests impacting their choices? There is a gracious plenty of systemic elitism in politics already. We need not promote more of it.

Phil Van Hoy, Charlotte

Why can’t prayer be a private activity?

In response to “Americans united when it comes to saying grace” (June 24):

In response to your article on the tradition of saying grace: slavery, segregation and circumcision are also traditions. These are all foolish traditions as are public displays of “faith.”

I live in a community that is populated by people of many faiths and some of no faith and they treat community socials like church dinners and insist on having oral prayers. I quit attending because I was told I could leave the room if I did not want to participate. It is rude to force religious rituals on people in secular settings. Leaving the room is much like telling blacks to sit in the back of the bus. If people want to be religious they should do it in church or the privacy of their homes.

Jerry Haney, Charlotte

Is violence the American way?

Back in the 1960s, H. Rap Brown was quoted as saying “violence is as American as cherry pie.” Ironically, Brown was the chairman of SNCC (the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee). However, it appears he was correct. As we retreat to our respective corners of this deeply divided country, it seems verbal attacks are transitioning into more physical attacks.

Unfortunately, there doesn’t seem to be a political leader left, right, or center who can come up with a solution to this problem.

Now more than ever we need an answer to the question once posed by Rodney King: “Can we all get along?”

Jack Matthews, Charlotte

Commending CMPD for homicide arrests

In response to “Here are the names of Charlotte's homicide victims” (June 26):

Forty-seven names of homicide victims as of June 20 are listed in the paper. As sad and scary as that is I commend the police for the arrests made in 30 of the cases. It’s no consolation to the family and friends of the 16 victims whose assailants haven’t been caught yet. However, it is a hopeful sign to them that arrests are more likely than not.

L.W. Bellamy, Mint Hill

The Democrats are gaining ground

In response to “Special elections send warning to both parties” (June 22):

Although they didn’t win after special elections and the 2016 presidential election, Democrats actually made gains.

While going zero for four with special elections, most were much closer than expected in strong Republican districts.

With Trump’s historically low approval ratings, Republicans are the ones who should really be concerned.

Kenneth Holder,

Mooresville

Provide treatment to avoid DUIs

In response to “With three DUI arrests, she still had her license...” (June 18):

Ms. Kelly Ann Conkin is not evil. I agree with her attorney. Yet she bears the full responsibility of her choice to drink and drive as well as the resulting death of Cecelia Buitrago de Gonzalez.

In many states, legislators and judges have become educated as to the impact of addiction and its resulting injuries and fatalities from drinking and driving. This issue is the drinking, not the driving. Court judgments must be consistent across states and court systems must have access to current records so that judges and attorneys have accurate data upon which to judge a case.

Lives are at stake. Don’t restrict a driving privilege; mandate treatment and address the real cause – addiction.

Elaine Deck, Cornelius

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