Viewpoint

As election nears, some thoughts on immigration

Donald Trump would institute an immigration policy similar to, ironically, liberal countries like Denmark.
Donald Trump would institute an immigration policy similar to, ironically, liberal countries like Denmark. AP

Having spent time in Germany as a visiting professor, I have been long fascinated with the subject of immigration. So here are some thoughts on immigration, just in time for the election.

Cheating on tests.

Aren’t my students who cheat just trying to make a better life for themselves? They pay tons of money and work hard; if we just look the other way and give them their degree, they will become good citizens and pay taxes, right? So why do we treat them so differently from illegal immigrants?

Visa overstayers.

Half of illegal immigrants got here by overstaying visas. Every year, 500,000 people overstay, but we deport only 2,500 of them! They signed a contract to leave the country by a date, so they lied to us. They should be the first to be deported. At least the border crossers made no such promises.

Sustainability.

It’s all the rage. But how do you become sustainable by importing more people? In the ’80s it was 600,000 a year, in the ’90s 800,000 a year, and now its 1.1 million a year. Legal plus illegal immigrant numbers hit 3 million over the past 2 years! Democrats, don’t mention climate change until you stop this hypocrisy.

STEM workers.

We are constantly warned about the STEM-worker shortage, even though my engineering classes have doubled in size in less than 5 years, with (American) students hanging from the rafters. Could we ever graduate enough students to satisfy the corporate lust for cheap foreign labor?

Men without work.

One of six working-age males in the U.S. is not even looking for work, according to a recent Mona Charen article. If immigration levels weren’t so high, companies and society might be more motivated to deal with this quiet catastrophe that contributed to Charlotte’s riots.

The second law of thermodynamics.

In layman’s terms it is: If you don’t work to stop it from happening, things will evolve into a state of chaos. Remember, this is God’s law that applies to the entire universe; it will never be broken. If the D.C. elite took some science classes, maybe they wouldn’t think open borders and sanctuary cities will work out fine.

“Immigrants are better than we are”

Of course they work hard, but they aren’t morally superior to us. They’re making ten times what they made back home. If you paid me $500,000 a year to sneak into Canada to work and would do nothing to me if I got caught, I’d give it some serious thought.

“We can’t do anything about illegal immigration.”

Oh, yes, we can. Only problem is, a president hasn’t taken a stand on illegal immigration in more than 50 years. But President Eisenhower showed us what is possible. In the early ‘50s, millions crossed the border illegally. Wages along the Rio Grande had fallen by 50 percent. LBJ was for open borders because his ranching buddies wanted the cheap labor. But Ike cleaned house, moving the corrupt immigration officials out of Texas where their LBJ connections did them no good. With only 10 percent of today’s immigration agents, illegal immigration was reduced by 95 percent within 5 years.

Donald Trump has his flaws. But finally, we have a candidate who won’t be owned by the corporations and would institute an immigration policy similar to, ironically, liberal countries like Denmark.

And we can’t keep breaking the second law of thermodynamics. If we don’t keep working on it, we will get chaos. It’s inevitable.

Mark Thies is the Dow Chemical Professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at Clemson University.

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