Charlotte Hornets

Former Charlotte Hornet ‘almost broke’; gets to lower child support payments

By Jose Lambiet

For the Miami Herald

Small forward Glen Rice played in the NBA from 1989 to 2004. He began his pro career in Miami, along with stints in Charlotte, Los Angeles, New York and Houston.
Small forward Glen Rice played in the NBA from 1989 to 2004. He began his pro career in Miami, along with stints in Charlotte, Los Angeles, New York and Houston. THE CHARLOTTE OBSERVER

Three-time NBA All-Star Former NBA Miami Heat superstar Glen Rice is “almost broke” despite a 15-year career in the NBA that also included a stints with the Miami Heat, the Charlotte Hornets and the Los Angeles Lakers.

At least, that’s according to Miami-Dade County court records made public earlier this month in a paternity suit filed against Rice by a Fort Lauderdale woman in 2010.

READ MORE: How to keep pro athletes from going broke

The woman, Broward County guardian ad litem staffer Robin Duncan, originally managed to squeeze $1,500 a month in child support for a little girl named Gianna fathered by the then-married prolific small forward.

Last year, however, Rice filed a heart-wrenching plea to the court system to substantially lower his monthly payments, and both the court and Duncan signed off on a new deal.

On Sept. 8, Duncan agreed to $600 a month for as long as Rice got caught up with unpaid support totaling $2,000.

Why a downward adjustment, something relatively rare in child support?

Rice hasn’t been able to find a job in years, and he is “almost broke” after living off his basketball assets since he retired in 2004 and making a slew of bad investments, according to the court papers.

“A permanent, material, substantial, unanticipated and involuntary change in circumstances [warranted] a downward modification in support,” the filing reads. “The father (Rice) is in dire financial straits … He has attempted to become gainfully employed in various capacities but has been unable to earn a semblance of meaningful income.”

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The paperwork described how Rice makes money from appearances and signing memorabilia. He has also worked at basketball camps and even has been tutoring well-to-do kids in basketball.

Not enough for big child support payments, his attorney argued in the case.

Neither Rice’s lawyer nor Duncan’s returned calls for comments.

It is estimated Rice earned $35 million in his career, which included three All Star appearances.

jose@gossipextra.com

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