Tom Sorensen

A great fight, an interesting fight and a memory make this boxing fan smile

When September’s Canelo Alvarez (left) vs. Gennady Golovkin (right) fight happens, neither fighter will do much backing up.
When September’s Canelo Alvarez (left) vs. Gennady Golovkin (right) fight happens, neither fighter will do much backing up. AP

Fans might not leave their homes to watch local boxing. But certain pay-per-view fights are difficult to ignore. Such fights are rare, but two of them are coming.

In Las Vegas in September Gennady Golovkin will fight Canelo Alvarez. The second fight will involve what might as well be different species. Mixed martial arts star Colin McGregor will fight boxing star Floyd Mayweather.

Mayweather, 40, has never lost, and I can’t envision him starting to lose now. The fight is in a ring, not an octagon. Mayweather is 49-0 in that ring. He is the best defensive fighter of all time.

McGregor, 28, was a youth boxing champion in Ireland, and is the best MMA boxer I’ve seen. He’ll entice MMA fans, which typically skew younger than boxing fans, to watch. The fight will be a spectacle.

Because I don’t think it will be close, I’ll try not to pay $100, or whatever the charge is to watch at home. I’ll fail.

I won’t even pretend I might not buy the Golovkin-Alvarez fight. I’m in. Golovkin is 37-0 with 33 knockouts, Alvarez 49-1-1 with 34 knockouts. Alvarez has improved markedly since his one-sided 2013 loss to Mayweather. Give him credit. Golovkin is the middleweight nobody wanted to fight.

Golovkin, 35, will go at Alvarez. If Golovkin fought a moving car, he’d attack the car. It’s how he fights and how he wins.

Alvarez, 26, isn’t a dancer. He, too, generates tremendous power.

If you’re a boxing fan, this one will be good. It will be good even if you’re not.

One final boxing note: Muhammad Ali died a year ago last week. Sometimes it doesn’t seem that long. Sometimes it seems longer. When I think about him, my initial thought is always sad; I can’t believe he’s not with us. Then I think about all that he did, and the way he did it, and smile.

Tom Sorensen is a retired Charlotte Observer columnist. Sign up for his newsletter, and follow him on Twitter: @tomsorensen

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