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The Margarita Confessionals: We hate Valentine’s Day but not for reasons you’d expect

Popular Valentine's Day confections packages that people are buying at The Secret Chocolatier,  which makes and sells handmade chocolate products. For story on hot sellers for small businesses selling valentine's day-related products.    DIEDRA LAIRD - dlaird@charlotteobserver.com
Popular Valentine's Day confections packages that people are buying at The Secret Chocolatier, which makes and sells handmade chocolate products. For story on hot sellers for small businesses selling valentine's day-related products. DIEDRA LAIRD - dlaird@charlotteobserver.com dlaird@charlotteobserver.com

Welcome back to Margarita Monday! Each week, we’ll be publishing a story about dating by Lauren Levine and/or Ali Washburn to go along with the latest episode of “The Margarita Confessionals,” a podcast for the jaded dater. You can find it on Soundcloud or iTunes.

Here at the Margarita Confessionals, we hate Valentine’s Day, but not for the reasons you’d expect. We’re not those girls who whine, “This is National Singles’ Awareness Day! Boo hoo!” In fact quite the opposite.

We are perfectly content to drink some wine, watch something good on Netflix, or go out with our friends.

The reason we hate Valentine’s Day runs deeper than that: we hate it because of its implications for both single people and those in relationships.

Valentine’s Day, in theory, is great. Shower your boo with love and affection. That’s super cool. But if you don’t have someone buying you an overpriced dinner and a floral arrangement, you shouldn’t feel like there’s something wrong with you.

Even if you’re in a relationship, Valentine’s Day basically sets you up for failure. Maybe the two of you have differing ideas about what celebrating the holiday means. Perhaps your boyfriend really did nail it, but then some girl in your office got a dozen roses delivered to her desk and suddenly your little box of chocolates feels inferior. It’s nearly impossible to come out of this holiday unscathed, regardless of your relationship status.

Remember: it truly doesn’t matter what your relationship status happens to be when an arbitrary holiday created by Hallmark strikes.

To counteract the inherent cheesiness that permeates the air in the days and weeks leading up to Valentine’s Day, we have some suggestions about how to infuse some authenticity back into Feb. 14:

If you’re single

Hang out with fellow single people. Drink wine. Make dinner at someone’s house. You could also host a brunch for your friends, so that even if they’re in a relationship they can come during the day and spend time with their “person” later on.

At night, feel free to binge-watch guilty pleasure TV for hours on end. “The Real Housewives” franchise was basically invented for nights like this.

If you’re in a relationship

Don’t feel like you have to snag reservations at some super swanky restaurant just because of the date on the calendar. Instead, do something meaningful for you as a couple. Do you love a particular type of food? Find a new restaurant and try it out. Re-visit the place where you had your first date. Take a day trip to a place you haven’t visited. Make dinner at home.

No matter what your love life looks like this Valentine’s Day, don’t let the hype and pressure of the holiday get to you. You’ll make it through, and if you really need something to help you keep the morale up, remember that chocolate will be super discounted on the 15th.

Photo: Diedra Laird/Charlotte Observer

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