People

You’re mostly young, mostly Democrats and some of you like Trump

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets supporters as she arrives to speak to supporters at her election night watch party for the South Carolina Democratic primary in Columbia, S.C., Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets supporters as she arrives to speak to supporters at her election night watch party for the South Carolina Democratic primary in Columbia, S.C., Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) AP

Last week, we asked you a few questions. We wanted to know if you Felt the Bern or wanted Hillary for America. We wanted to know if you wanted to Make America Great Again or take a Cruz. We wanted to know if you even cared.

Now we know.

Before we go any farther, a disclaimer: Take this for what it is, an informal survey of our readership. I don’t think the candidates will be using this data to inform their campaigns leading up to the March 15 presidential primaries.

On to the results.

First, who responded?

We got 369 responses to the 10-question survey, the bulk of which were female (56 percent) and between the ages of 21 and 39 (61 percent).

You’re politically active (or at least claim to be)

A whopping 96 percent of respondents said they were registered to vote, 94 percent said they voted in the 2012 presidential election and 82 percent said they planned to vote in the March 15 primary.

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That’s a lot. It’s easy to click a button on a survey, though. We’ll see how many people actually show up to vote. (It should be noted that voting is almost as easy as clicking a button on a survey, y’all. No excuses.)

In the 2012 general election, 56.5 percent of registered voters aged 18-29 in North Carolina voted. In the 2012 primary, just 28.5 percent of registered voters in Mecklenburg County cast a ballot.

Also, the vast majority of respondents said they either followed the election fairly closely (49 percent) or very closely (40 percent). If that means you’re watching all of the debates, you have higher pain tolerance than I do.

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You’re Democrats (or “Independents”)

Forty percent of respondents identify as Democrats, followed by 31 percent Independent and 24 percent Republican, and 43 percent of all respondents said they wouldn’t vote in the Republican primary.

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I put quotes around “Independents” for a reason. Of the 113 people who said they identified as Independent, 35 percent said they wouldn’t vote in the Republican primary while only 12 percent said they wouldn’t vote in the Democratic primary.

Of the Independent respondents who said they’d vote in the Republican primary, the most (24 percent) said they’d vote for John Kasich (makes sense). Independents were pro-Bernie (36 percent to Clinton’s 35) on the Democratic side.

Some of you like Trump

Forty-three percent of respondents said they wouldn’t vote in the Republican primary. Behind that, Marco Rubio had the most support among respondents with 19 percent and Kasich was second with 16.

Third — The Donald. Trump got 9 percent, ahead of Not Sure (6 percent), Ted Cruz (3 percent) and Ben Carson (literally two people).

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Before you think it was just old men picking Trump — 58 percent of the people who selected him were women and 46 percent were aged 21-39.

You’re not Feeling the Bern

Hillary Clinton led the Democratic field with 35 percent of respondents. Sanders was second with 29 percent.

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I already told you that Bernie won with Independents. Here are some other fun numbers:

– 36 percent of female respondents selected Clinton compared to 27 for Sanders.

– 34 percent of male respondents selected Clinton, compared to 31 for Sanders.

– 54 percent of respondents who identified as Democrats roll with Hillary.

You really care about the economy.

It makes sense that 73 percent of respondents said the economy is one of the top three issues that matters most to them, given the the young slant of this survey. Many of us graduated into a bad job market and might be saddled with student loan debt.

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And it didn’t matter who respondents said they would vote for. The economy was the top issue for people who picked Trump, Clinton, Rubio, Sanders, Cruz, Carson and Kasich.

Other issues people care about:

– Social issues (49 percent)

– Healthcare (45 percent)

– Education and national security (both 40 percent). The number for national security was much higher — 77 percent — for respondents who would vote for Trump.

How will this compare to the primary results March 15? We’ll see.

Photo: AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

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