Local Arts

Your 5-minute guide to the best things to do in Charlotte | March 10-16

“Protesting a better education” by Bradley Tucker of Charlotte, in “Apple Pie: An American Art Show” at Goodyear. IT’s a photograph of a performance piece Tucker did on a Moral Monday in Raleigh, dressed as a banker with a 10-foot pencil and a checkbook: “I proceeded to write and erase checks to the future education of North Carolina.” Tucker says he used reclaimed wood and copper from a schoolhouse recently closed because of a shrinking budget.
“Protesting a better education” by Bradley Tucker of Charlotte, in “Apple Pie: An American Art Show” at Goodyear. IT’s a photograph of a performance piece Tucker did on a Moral Monday in Raleigh, dressed as a banker with a 10-foot pencil and a checkbook: “I proceeded to write and erase checks to the future education of North Carolina.” Tucker says he used reclaimed wood and copper from a schoolhouse recently closed because of a shrinking budget. Courtesy of the artist

What is there to do in Charlotte this weekend? Here’s our experts’ picks on everything from entertainment – movies to music to theater – to food and wine, beer and restaurants. And shopping, of course...

Friday

▪ A much anticipated sophomore effort from curator and artist Grace Stott, “Apple Pie: An American Art Show,” opens March 10 at Goodyear Arts. With submissions from 50 different artists, this patriotic show is sure to be diverse. The show is described as a curated exhibition addressing the intersection of the identities of American artists and how they relate to, synthesize, or explore what America is or what it represents. With at least 15 of these artists from Charlotte, we are looking forward to seeing our neighbors’ perspectives on the topic presented alongside artists from all over the country. – KS

▪ Indie folk band The Head and the Heart decamped to separate places on the globe (Haiti to Richmond) and got back to life outside of touring before hitting reset. New album “Signs of Light” expands on its folk-rock and indie roots, and the recharged sextet readies for a busy festival season with a show at 8 p.m. at Ovens Auditorium. – CD

Saturday

▪ Poet and founder of the Spring Literary Festival at CPCC, Irene Blair Honeycutt has known loss – three brothers to death. Her fourth collection of poems, “Beneath the Bamboo Sky,” is a testament to those brothers and those losses. Honeycutt will read from her new collection and talk about her writing process at 11 a.m. at Park Road Books. Free. – DP

▪ The fifth annual RunJenRun 5K, which starts at 8 a.m. at Symphony Park in SouthPark, benefits the GoJenGo Foundation in its fight against breast cancer. If the kids aren’t up for running that far, there’s a kids’ fun zone that includes an obstacle course, a bounce house, a KnockerBall, temporary tattoos, hair and face painting and more. Last year, more than 800 people participated. www.runjenrun5k.com. – TJ

▪ The Piedmont Culinary Guild, Charlotte’s grassroots group that links chefs, farmers and food makers, holds its second annual Food and Beverage Symposium at the Art Institute of Charlotte Saturday and Sunday. This year’s seminars cover everything from social media to making shrubs and kombuchas to butchering, plus historian Tom Hanchett on his global food discoveries for The Observer’s column “Food From Home.” Registration is $175 and covers both days at www.piedmontculinaryguild.com. – KP

▪ Watch out for the big bar crawl. The 17th Annual St. Patrick’s Day Pub Crawl, put on by Rich & Bennett, claims to be the world’s largest. Check-in is noon-3 p.m. at 219 E. 7th St. (We hear the women’s T-shirts, mandatory for free entrance into the bars, run a bit small. Plan accordingly.) – KP

▪ Christian rock band Casting Crowns returns to Bojangles’ Coliseum at 6 p.m. with its “The Very Next Thing Tour,” which also features opening acts Unspoken and former “American Idol” finalist Danny Gokey. – TJ

Sunday

▪ “The Bodyguard” stars Deborah Cox as the R&B singer whose life has been threatened; she falls in love with the guy protecting her, all the while belting the Oscar-nominated music Whitney Houston made famous in the 1992 film. The Broadway Lights tour closes after performances at 1:30 and 7 p.m. – LT

▪ One reviewer has called Charlotte native David Joy’s second novel, “The Weight of this World,” a beautiful nightmare “of lives swirling down the drain in a haze of meth, abuse, blood, and, of all things, love.” Joy will be reading from this new novel at 3 p.m., at Barnes & Noble at Carolina Place Mall. Free. – DP

Tuesday

▪ Head to Southern France, on your plate at least, at Stoke at the Marriott City Center. The restaurant pairs with the on-site wine outlet The Bottle Shop for the start of a new wine dinner series, starting with the Languedoc-Roussillon region. Can chef Chris Coleman’s smoked pork shoulder go with French cabernet franc? It will cost you $100 to find out. (Don’t worry, you get lot more courses and more wines.) 704-353-6005. – KP

▪ Enjoy some of the state’s best wines in the pretty surroundings of the Duke Mansion from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the N.C. Fine Wines “ShowCase.” For $100, you get a tasting of the top 12 wines from the recent state competition, along with appetizers. Profits go to a scholarship for N.C. students in wine-related fields. www.ncfinewines.com.– KP

Thursday

▪ Sarah Creamer’s mother once told her daughter, “You ain’t got you one good mama bone in you, girl.” Hence the title, “One Good Mama Bone” Bren McClain’s debut novel. The Anderson, S.C., native will read at 7 p.m. at Park Road Books. Free. – DP

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