Local Arts

What’s up this week in Charlotte’s visual arts?

The Modernism in the Mountains panel discussion 6 p.m. April 18 at the Knight Theater will focus on the history and impact of Black Mountain College, which closed in 1957.
The Modernism in the Mountains panel discussion 6 p.m. April 18 at the Knight Theater will focus on the history and impact of Black Mountain College, which closed in 1957. Image courtesy of the Western Regional Archives, State Archives of North Carolina.

WHAT TO DO

Attend the Modernism in the Mountains panel discussion April 18 at 6 p.m., hosted by the Charlotte Museum of History and the Bechtler Museum of Modern Art. This discussion will focus on the history and importance of Black Mountain College, an unlikely refuge for artistic pioneers in the Blue Ridge Mountains.


Although it was only open for 24 years, it continues to influence art, design, architecture and fashion. Panelists include John Boyer, president and CEO of the Bechtler; Siu Challons-Lipton, executive director of the Art, Design and Music Department at Queens University; Randy Shull, a contemporary artist who designed and fabricated the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center in Asheville; and Murray Whisnant, a modernist architect, artist and furniture designer.


The panel will be moderated by Meg Freeman Whalen, director of communications and external relations for the College of Arts + Architecture at UNC Charlotte. The Charlotte Museum of History will announce the date of the 2019 Mad About Modern home tour at the conclusion of the event at the Knight Theater. Tickets are $25 and include admission to a reception at the Bechtler. Online registration is at charlottemuseum.org/events.

WHERE TO GO

On April 19 from 6-9 p.m., visit Hot Glass Alley near NoDa for an open demonstration. The glass art atelier will have artists flame working on the torches, as well as artists blowing in the hot shop. This free event is open to all ages. Details: hotglassalley.com


WHO TO MEET

Crista Cammaroto will reveal her latest Terra Forma installation at Mint Museum Uptown on April 17 from 6-9 p.m. during the museum’s weekly free evening event. Her installation is presented as a part of Constellation CLT, a new museum-wide project designed to connect visitors to talent in the local community.


To create her installations, Cammaroto pulls forms out of the existing environment to create a “drop,” which involves placing a ring to create a formal circumference: a terra form. She digs and forms the earth, then adds elements of flora to complete the design. In addition to the installation on view April 17-28, an exhibition of photos documenting past Terra Forma installations will remain on view through July 7. Details: mintmuseum.org/constellationclt-crista-cammaroto/


Each week, Grace Cote and Lia Newman offer Observer readers a to-do list on immersing yourself in visual arts around town. Newman is director/curator of the Van Every/Smith Galleries at Davidson College; Cote is senior coordinator at Jerald Melberg Gallery.

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