A Pew paper, which surveyed more than 3,200 American adults, found that the vast majority of us own cellphones and are rarely parted from them. But it also documented striking new patterns in how and where we use our phones, particularly in places where, even two or three years ago, whipping out a cellphone would be considered rude.
A Pew paper, which surveyed more than 3,200 American adults, found that the vast majority of us own cellphones and are rarely parted from them. But it also documented striking new patterns in how and where we use our phones, particularly in places where, even two or three years ago, whipping out a cellphone would be considered rude. Frank Franklin II AP
A Pew paper, which surveyed more than 3,200 American adults, found that the vast majority of us own cellphones and are rarely parted from them. But it also documented striking new patterns in how and where we use our phones, particularly in places where, even two or three years ago, whipping out a cellphone would be considered rude. Frank Franklin II AP

When is it rude to use your smartphone in public?

August 28, 2015 08:48 AM