Religion

Ty Boyd will be back on the radio Monday

Longtime listeners of WBT-AM (1110) will be forgiven if they tune in groggy Monday morning and think they've been hurled back in time.

Back at his old post will be Ty Boyd.

Boyd was morning host on the station from 1961 to 1973. He's in his third career now and going strong at age 73.

“That used to be old – until I got here,” says Boyd.

Boyd took over WBT's morning show from Grady Cole, known for his country wit and deep-throated stammer. By then, Cole had been doing the show for 32 years. Boyd was only 29.

It was a far different radio business then. Slower paced, genteel atmosphere.

“We played records, and all took the positive high side. Today I hear so much slice-and-dice and skewering. You've got to be a lot more edgy than you used to be, and edgy never made me happy.”

Rapid-fire news, sports, weather and traffic wasn't the formula then. He'd talk, then hand it off to Duke Ellington, Peggy Lee or Petula Clark.

Born in Erwin, Boyd grew up in Statesville. At 15, he got his first radio job, working at Statesville's old WSIC. After college, he was working at WCHL radio in Chapel Hill when WBT hired him. He was tops in the ratings from the start.

On his last day on the morning show, the station held an on-air roast and colleagues arrived to needle him.

“Next to Lawrence Welk, you're the funniest man in the city,” said station executive Jim Patterson.

“Somebody asked Boyd to bring a six-pack, and he showed up with a carton of milk and five glasses,” said deejay Don Russell.

“I always admired how you could get choked up about pork chops at 79 cents a pound at 7 in the morning,” cracked musician Arthur Smith.

Boyd says he loved being a local celebrity, but decided there was more to life.

“There was a day when I realized that there was more in the world than just being the cute guy on the radio. From that day forward, I was more serious about my speaking engagements.”

He stayed with Jefferson Pilot Broadcasting, doing the midday show on WBTV, until 1978. By then he had become a prominent inspirational speaker and decided to do that full-time. Speaking gigs took him and his wife, Pat, to five continents.

They started a business coaching communication skills to executives and other professionals. Ty Boyd Executive Learning Systems is now in its 28th year. Two of their six children work with the company.

Of all his careers, he likes teaching the best. “If I could come back and do it all over again, I'd be a teacher. I've enjoyed that more than anything else.”

On Monday's show, Boyd will be sitting in with Jim Szoke, who is anchoring “Charlotte Morning News” while Al Gardner and Stacey Simms are vacationing.

Media Movers

Former WSOC-FM morning host Jeff Roper joins WGFG-FM (“Star” 105.1) in Orangeburg, S.C., where he'll do mornings. He succeeds Russ Fender, who is retiring…Charlotte catering chef Louis Petrozza won the bake-off this week in the first half of the finale of Fox's “Hell's Kitchen.” He got to pick eliminated chefs to help him in the final challenge. One he chose was Ben Caylor of Cornelius. Next half: 9p.m. Tuesday, Channel 18.

Longtime listeners of WBT-AM (1110) will be forgiven if they tune in groggy Monday morning and think they've been hurled back in time.

Back at his old post will be Ty Boyd.

Boyd was morning host on the station from 1961 to 1973. He's in his third career now and going strong at age 73.

“That used to be old – until I got here,” says Boyd.

Boyd took over WBT's morning show from Grady Cole, known for his country wit and deep-throated stammer. By then, Cole had been doing the show for 32 years. Boyd was only 29.

It was a far different radio business then. Slower paced, genteel atmosphere.

“We played records, and all took the positive high side. Today I hear so much slice-and-dice and skewering. You've got to be a lot more edgy than you used to be, and edgy never made me happy.”

Rapid-fire news, sports, weather and traffic wasn't the formula then. He'd talk, then hand it off to Duke Ellington, Peggy Lee or Petula Clark.

Born in Erwin, Boyd grew up in Statesville. At 15, he got his first radio job, working at Statesville's old WSIC. After college, he was working at WCHL radio in Chapel Hill when WBT hired him. He was tops in the ratings from the start.

On his last day on the morning show, the station held an on-air roast and colleagues arrived to needle him.

“Next to Lawrence Welk, you're the funniest man in the city,” said station executive Jim Patterson.

“Somebody asked Boyd to bring a six-pack, and he showed up with a carton of milk and five glasses,” said deejay Don Russell.

“I always admired how you could get choked up about pork chops at 79 cents a pound at 7 in the morning,” cracked musician Arthur Smith.

Boyd says he loved being a local celebrity, but decided there was more to life.

“There was a day when I realized that there was more in the world than just being the cute guy on the radio. From that day forward, I was more serious about my speaking engagements.”

He stayed with Jefferson Pilot Broadcasting, doing the midday show on WBTV, until 1978. By then he had become a prominent inspirational speaker and decided to do that full-time. Speaking gigs took him and his wife, Pat, to five continents.

They started a business coaching communication skills to executives and other professionals. Ty Boyd Executive Learning Systems is now in its 28th year. Two of their six children work with the company.

Of all his careers, he likes teaching the best. “If I could come back and do it all over again, I'd be a teacher. I've enjoyed that more than anything else.”

On Monday's show, Boyd will be sitting in with Jim Szoke, who is anchoring “Charlotte Morning News” while Al Gardner and Stacey Simms are vacationing.

Media Movers

Former WSOC-FM morning host Jeff Roper joins WGFG-FM (“Star” 105.1) in Orangeburg, S.C., where he'll do mornings. He succeeds Russ Fender, who is retiring…Charlotte catering chef Louis Petrozza won the bake-off this week in the first half of the finale of Fox's “Hell's Kitchen.” He got to pick eliminated chefs to help him in the final challenge. One he chose was Ben Caylor of Cornelius. Next half: 9p.m. Tuesday, Channel 18.

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