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Atrium Health expands heart, vascular care with $115 million building near Charlotte

Atrium Health is scheduled to open a new, $115.2-million heart health building in August.

The new tower at the its Carolinas HealthCare System NorthEast location in Concord will serve heart and vascular patients, putting heart and radiology care in the same wing of the hospital campus.

The company said the 163,000-square-foot building is designed to increase efficiency in treating patients – to make sure it’s as easy as possible to get patients where they need to be. The tower will also house Atrium Health’s Sanger Heart & Vascular Institute.

The heart institute was running out of space in its old facility, Carolinas HealthCare System NorthEast President Phyllis Wingate said, and the tower will bring in patients from farther away.

Heart and radiology services were spaced out across the NorthEast campus before building the tower, according to Atrium.

The tower also has new technology, which will make it possible for doctors to treat patients quicker. The NorthEast location serves about 12,000 heart patients a year, according to Atrium.

“When you build a building, you get a whole new opportunity to think about (design) and put the patient first,” Sanger Heart & Vascular Institute President Geoffrey Rose said.

‘One-stop shop’

New imaging machines will allow doctors to see what’s going on inside patients quicker, and with much smaller doses of radiation, said Andrew Hines, radiology chief at the NorthEast campus.

The new heart and vascular tower is part of a multi-year modernization project for the NorthEast campus, according to Atrium. Cardiovascular patients are still being treated in an old wing of the campus.

Once patients can use the new tower, that old wing will be hosting other departments as the rest of the campus is renovated, Wingate said.

“We had the unique opportunity to upgrade everything at one time in this building,” Wingate said.

Sanger will be hiring more physicians as part of moving to a new building. The new tower has bigger rooms for the Cardiovascular ICU and more pre-operation rooms.

“It’s a one-stop shop, if you will, for where one goes to receive cardiac services,” Rose said.

Hannah Smoot covers business in Charlotte, focusing on aviation and health care. She previously covered money and power at The Rock Hill Herald in South Carolina. She is a lifelong North Carolinian and graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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