Business

Snyder’s-Lance will transition to cage-free eggs by 2025

Toast Chee crackers descend into the creamer machine where the peanut butter is applied. Josh Logan, packaging operations manager for the Snyder’s-Lance plant in Charlotte, conducted a tour of the Toast Chee production line on March 20, 2015.
Toast Chee crackers descend into the creamer machine where the peanut butter is applied. Josh Logan, packaging operations manager for the Snyder’s-Lance plant in Charlotte, conducted a tour of the Toast Chee production line on March 20, 2015. jsimmons@charlotteobserver.com

Charlotte-based snack maker Snyder’s-Lance says it’s transitioning its supply of eggs to 100 percent cage-free by 2025.

The manufacturer cited its sustainability goals as reason for the change. Its other sustainability efforts include opening a ground-based solar farm in Pennsylvania in 2011, as well as developing renewable packaging and launching recycling programs in its snack-making facilities.

“Snyder’s-Lance is committed to utilizing products and practices which reduce negative effects on the environment,” the company said in a statement this week.

Several Charlotte-area companies have said recently they’re taking similar steps with their egg supplies. Last month, the parent companies of Matthews-based Harris Teeter and Salisbury-based Food Lion also said they were transitioning to 100 percent cage-free egg supplies by 2025.

Other non-grocers are going cage-free, too: McDonald’s, for example, said in September it would transition to cage-free eggs over the next decade.

Snyder’s-Lance, known for Hanover’s pretzels and Lance peanut butter sandwich crackers, formed when Charlotte-based Lance Inc. merged with pretzel maker Snyder’s of Hanover in 2010. The company employs about 1,500 workers in Charlotte.

Katherine Peralta: 704-358-5079, @katieperalta

  Comments