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‘Super cooled’ ice added to forecast in western NC as frozen air moves across state

That frigid air moving through North Carolina in the next day now includes the possibility of both snow and ice in western counties, according to the National Weather Service.

Elsewhere in the state, temperatures will drop about 25 degrees in a 24 hour period, with a low in the mid 20s Friday night in the Charlotte area, forecasters say. A freeze watch has been put in effect for the Charlotte region late Friday night through Saturday morning.

The cold will move in just after an 80 percent chance of rain exits the state, bringing the possibility of some overlap, the National Weather Service says.

“If there is a problem, it might be on the Tennessee border as lingering moisture could result in a few showers changing to snow showers at the highest elevations as cold air comes in behind the front. Rime ice might also be a problem in those locations,” NWS forecasters said Thursday.

Rime ice is “an opaque coating of tiny, white, granular ice particles caused by the rapid freezing of super cooled water droplets on impact with an object,” according to the NWS.

“The front should pass in the pre-dawn hours on Friday with the back edge of the rain clearing the eastern zones before sunrise on Friday. Temps will remain too warm east of the mountains to worry about a freeze Friday morning” the NWS says.

A “hard freeze” is likely in the mountains and Interstate 40 corridor northwest of the Piedmont. The low Friday night in the Asheville area will be 25 and 31 degrees on Saturday.

Lows will rise above freezing on Sunday, with a high of 65 on Veterans Day, but will plummet on Tuesday and Wednesday into the 20s, according to AccuWeather.com.

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Mark Price has been a reporter for The Charlotte Observer since 1991, covering beats including schools, crime, immigration, the LGBTQ issues, homelessness and nonprofits. He graduated from the University of Memphis with majors in journalism and art history, and a minor in geology.
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