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Maya Angelou estate sale draws big crowds to NC

These are among the many items for sale this weekend in the Maya Angelou estate sale in Winston-Salem.
These are among the many items for sale this weekend in the Maya Angelou estate sale in Winston-Salem. WBTV

An estate sale for a North Carolina poet laureate is drawing big crowds in North Carolina.

Maya Angelou died in May 2014, at the age of 86, in her Winston-Salem home.

An estate sale for Angelou started Thursday and continues this weekend.

According to the group hosting the sale, items for purchase include furniture, books, art, suitcases, handbags and other household items.

Laster’s Fine Art & Antiques said the sale is expected to continue until Saturday, but media reports said there were big crowds on opening day.

“It’s just wonderful to just see people come out and want to own just a little piece of what she owned,” Stephanie Laster of Laster’s Fine Arts & Antiques told Time Warner Cable News

“I’ve always admired her work,” Pam Casstevens told TWC. “I’ve admired her as a woman. It just brings me joy to have some of her items now.”

Another shopper at the estate sale told WRAL-TV that he bought books to inspire his daughter. “Just to pick out some things that she touched or she lived with – you know, it’s nice,” said Javon Bell.

Clevette Holbert told WRAL-TV that she met Angelou years ago but became overwhelmed as she looked over a picnic basket owned by her “personal inspiration.”

“She was an idol of mine,” Holbert told WRAL-TV. “Memories, even talking about it brings me to tears.”

Proceeds will be donated to Angelou’s foundation and other charities.

Honored by presidents with the National Medal of Arts and the Presidential Medal of Freedom, Angelou wrote one of the most popular presidential inaugural poems in history. It was her poignant words that captured the nation’s attention during President Bill Clinton’s 1993 inauguration. That poem, “On the Pulse of the Morning,” became a best-seller.

For 30 years before her death, Angelou was a professor of American studies at Wake Forest University.

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