Crime & Courts

Sheriff: Rock Hill man shot, killed 3 victims before turning gun on himself

Anna and Randy Moore
Anna and Randy Moore Facebook

Randy Moore fatally shot his wife, stepson and stepson’s girlfriend at his Rock Hill home Sunday before turning the gun on himself, the York County Sheriff’s Office confirmed Tuesday.

The victims were Moore’s wife, Assistant York County Manager Anna Hubbard Moore, 50; her son, Jason Lockamy, 31; and Lockamy’s girlfriend, Lora Kathryn Young, 31.

All four were found shot dead Sunday at 985 Dunlap Roddey Road in Rock Hill.

Sheriff’s investigators are still trying to determine what motivated Moore to go on the deadly rampage before taking his own life, spokesman Trent Faris said during a news conference Tuesday. The type of gun used hasn’t been released, and investigators are awaiting the results of some forensic tests before releasing more information.

“We want to be 100 percent before we release anything else,” Faris said, adding that the process of investigation is “very intense.” He said investigators are working as quickly as possible to get answers for the victims’ family members and the public.

The State Law Enforcement Division is assisting in the investigation, but the sheriff’s office is the lead investigative agency.

York County Coroner Sabrina Gast said Tuesday that the autopsies had been completed but that any further information beyond the cause of death would have to come from the families.

A friend found the bodies at the home and called 911 about 5:40 p.m. Sunday, Faris said. Two bodies were found inside the home and two were found outside.

It’s not clear when the victims were shot or how long they had been dead before the friend found them, but authorities say the shooting happened the same day the bodies were found.

“Neighbors reported to us that they thought they heard firecrackers at the time,” Faris said. “But being the day after the Fourth of July, that’s not uncommon.”

There were no known calls to law enforcement for domestic disputes between the couple, Faris said. Deputies responded to a possible break-in at the home a couple of weeks ago, but that is not believed to be related to the shooting.

Randy Moore had a criminal record dating back to 1978, when he was 18, according to State Law Enforcement Division and state court records. That includes multiple convictions for driving under the influence and one conviction for conspiracy to violate South Carolina drug laws.

Faris said investigators were not aware of any convictions that would have prevented Moore from owning a gun.

As assistant county manager, Anna Moore oversaw several divisions, Animal Control, the Department of Fire Safety, Emergency Management, the detention center, Public Safety Communications and the Summer Feeding Program.

Moore also served as interim county manager in 2013 while the County Council searched for a replacement for Jim Baker. The council ultimately hired Bill Shanahan.

Faris stressed Tuesday the investigation won’t be affected by Moore’s position in county government, where she oversaw many public safety operations and worked with many of the people who responded to the scene of her murder.

“We would treat this case just like it was any other case involving four people who didn’t work for the county, or one person, or someone who drives a garbage truck who works for the county,” he said. “But we are trying to make this case go a little bit quicker so we can hopefully get some answers. ... We want the family to have some answers.”

Tuesday’s announcement came as a surprise to Moore’s former colleagues at the county manager’s office.

County Manager Bill Shanahan said his office hasn’t been intimately involved with the investigation or sent any updates on the case as it goes forward. Their only involvement, Shanahan said, comes in the form of Moore’s former office, which investigators have asked the county to keep sealed off.

Inside the administrative hallways at the County Agricultural Building in York, Moore’s office was decorated Tuesday with a wreath her co-workers placed there Tuesday, right beside the “Do Not Enter” sign taped to the door.

Moore’s colleagues split the bill for the wreath of white roses as a reminder of their fallen friend.

“We just wanted something that says we love each other here, and do something special for Anna,” said office manager Linda Norris.

Shanahan said he’d met many of Moore’s family members since he took over the manager’s job in 2013, including her young grandchildren, but the only time he can recall meeting Randy was when the couple attended a conference together.

“We share the grief with county employees who knew Anna Moore,” Faris said. “And we are doing everything we can at this point in the investigation to find out exactly why this occurred, and the hope is to find out how and why it occurred.”

In the two days since the shooting, life at the county administrative building has taken on a kind of eerie calm, as Anna Moore’s co-workers try to get their lives back to normal.

“It’s been real quiet, like we’re all walking around in shock,” Shanahan said, standing by the floral display. “Every time we walk by the door, it’s like it all comes back.”

Teddy Kulmala •  803-329-4082

Bristow Marchant •  803-329-4062

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