Opinion

Did Stephen Curry really say the moon landings were fake? We hope not.

Former Davidson star Stephen Curry, a two-time NBA MVP, said in a podcast that he is skeptical that astronauts landed on the moon.
Former Davidson star Stephen Curry, a two-time NBA MVP, said in a podcast that he is skeptical that astronauts landed on the moon.

Steph Curry, no.

The moon landings are not fake. Don’t question it, even if you were kidding about it.

We’re not sure which you were doing when you went on a podcast recently and said you didn’t think astronauts had actually been to the moon, as NBCSports.com reported today.

It happened on Winging It, a light-hearted podcast, with three other NBA players — Vince Carter, Kent Bazemore and Andre Iguodala. During the banter, you asked: “We ever been to the moon?” When that was met with some no’s, you said: “They’re gonna come get us. I don’t think so, either.”

No.

Truth has already taken a beating in 2018. Our president set new highs (or lows) for the frequency he utters falsehoods. He continues to claim reports he doesn’t like are “fake news,” a term that is becoming alarmingly non-partisan.

It’s not just Donald Trump. Climate change deniers continue to ignore science, as do anti-vaxxers. Experts are considered elitists instead of, well, experts. And, of course, there’s QAnon. Look it up, if you dare.

Does it matter if one more person makes one more ludicrous statement? It does, if that person is an NBA star and Charlotte son whom children and others look up to. It matters in an era where people are being encouraged not to believe that which is plainly reality. It matters in a cultural and political landscape in which the distinction between true and false is becoming more difficult to discern. It threatens our public discourse, and more.

Not to lay that all on one dumb remark — or, we hope, joke — about the moon. But we’d all be better off with fewer loony remarks from public figures. It’s not that we want you to shut up and dribble. The opposite, in fact. We want you to understand the weight of your words. They matter. So does truth.

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