Opinion

A small tax is worth giving the arts to all

Raising taxes worth helping the arts

In response to “Many other ways to fund the arts” (July 16 Forum) and related articles:

As a freelance curator and art historian working throughout Mecklenburg County, I eagerly support the proposed quarter-cent tax increase.

While I have the ease and ability to travel between Cornelius, Uptown, Plaza Midwood, South End and University City, many do not. Many are restricted due to lack of easily accessible public transportation, work schedules and/or costs. The allocated extra funds would allow for an abundance of new artistic and cultural opportunities for residents.

While raised taxes are not the favorite of any person, no matter their socio-economic standing, the mere tax amounts to .25 per $100. Is that not worth it to provide music, ballet, plays, sculpture, painting and other creative activities for all?

Marrisa Pascucci, Cornelius

Arts help cultivate creative thinking

The writer is the co-owner of Free Range Brewing:

My company, along with myself, believe it is important to foster creativity while building a strong community foundation. The arts are a huge part of cultivating the community and it starts with engaging children.

Access to the arts and creativity increases self-confidence and self-understanding, fosters creative problem solving, enhances communication skills, improves cognition, develops leadership skills and brings communities together.

As MFA graduates, BFA college graduates and business owners, we made it a goal to engage with the arts and our community as much as possible. This tax increase would help to bring creativity and engagement with the arts to all parts of the Charlotte community.

Sarah Alexander, Charlotte

We need to make sure they’re legal

In response to “Are you OK with a racist president, Republicans?” (July 15):

The editorial board says “legal migrants are being locked up in cages.” These people are being held because their status as migrants has yet to be officially determined. Even if currently they have not done anything illegal to cause them to be locked up, I say their claim of asylum must first be determined to be valid and that is why they are being held.

Holding them ensures their availability when it's time to defend their claim.

Robert R. Cuminale, Charlotte

Trump never said anything racist

The media and the left’s predictable cries of “racism” against Trump demonstrates either an obtuse understanding of what constitutes racism or an obstinance in your beliefs that anything said by him simply has to be racist. Trump never mentioned anyone’s color or race.

As for Rep. Omar, I personally am disgusted by her continual denigration of the country whose servicemen have died attempting to assist the UN in feeding her fellow starving Somalians and wholeheartedly agree with the president that she should return to her native country if the one that accepted her as a citizen is such a horrid place.

Regardless, inferring Trump’s remarks to be racism further demonstrates the unhinged nature of the left in America today.

Dan Millard, Charlotte

Not everything is about race

Jim Cherry
Jim Cherry

The Charlotte Observer Editorial Board and Forum writers are totally wrong with their criticism of our president.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and her band of radicals need to stop being critical and appreciate this great country. Any time this group is challenged, the battle cry is always “you are a racist” and it is constant. In my opinion, it feels like the state always tries to take priority over the citizens and great promises always seem to end poorly.

The liberal left needs to get over the election lost and support our great President Donald J. Trump.

Jim Cherry, Charlotte

Medicare is not welfare

In response to “Housing assistance is needed today” (July 16 Forum):

I wanted to educate those who don’t know that Medicare is not welfare. Medicare payments are taken out of your paycheck your whole working life and paid back to you after the age of 65. As is Social Security. Also, the GI Bill is a grant given to military servicemen and women who have put their lives on the line and served our country in the military.

Housing assistance, on the other hand, is most positively welfare in all cases.

Gregory Gang, Charlotte

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