Letters to the Editor

Mayor Roberts, how far will you take political correctness?

Political correctness is out of control

In response to “Mayor seeks to rename Stonewall, rival raises ’06 vote” (Aug. 24):

Our illustrious Mayor Jennifer Roberts wants to rename Stonewall Street, as it may offend some one. Well, why stop there? I am sure someone will object to our streets that have religious connotations. For example, let’s ban, in the interest of separating church and state, streets such as Luther, Hebron and Providence. Similarly, South Blvd. must go as an obvious reference to the “South.” And then there’s Queens, Colony and Kings streets which have a clear reference to the British domination of the New World.

The question for Mayor Roberts is: Where do you stop with your version of political correctness?

Don McIver, Charlotte

Can we repurpose Stonewall name?

Maybe we could rededicate Stonewall Street to include not just its historic namesake, Gen. Stonewall Jackson, but the LGBT civil rights pioneers who pushed back against a brutal police raid at the Stonewall Inn in New York City in 1969, paving the way toward Sunday’s largest-ever gay pride (or any other kind of annual) parade in Charlotte.

Eli Branscome, Charlotte

I agree, don’t prohibit hate speech

In response to “Condemn, but protect, the speech of hate” (Aug. 22 Opinion):

The editorial about protecting hate speech is an editorial I can get 100 percent behind. I personally think white supremacists are evil. However, when we start protecting some speech and forbidding other types of speech, we are on that slippery slope that leads to the government telling us what we can and can’t do. There is already too much of that to suit me.

Jill Kruger Wagner,

Charlotte

Ostapko
Sham Ostapko

Confederate symbols are extremist

In response to “Tell extremists find your own symbols “(Aug. 28 Forum):

The extremists are using the right symbols to represent their cause. I know you can be a Republican without being an extremist. However, I truly don’t see how anyone (Republican or otherwise) can take pride in the Confederate flag or Confederate monuments that squarely represent those who proudly fought for the right to own black people. Period. You can’t have it both ways Mr. Sharpton. If any part of you takes pride in that part of your heritage, you are extreme too. Own it!

Sham Ostapko, Huntersville

Laurent
Dan Laurent

GOP has to do more than criticize Trump

In response to “Here’s why Trump isn’t...” (Aug. 26 Viewpoint):

Trump is not a Republican, but rather the solo star of his own drama.

I generally concur with John Danforth’s op-ed but feel his recommendation is not sufficiently aggressive. Disassociation from Trump is fine, but why not pursue a more direct solution? Let’s make Trump a two-year president. I believe our country – and the Republican Party – would be better off if Trump were to leave the White House at the two-year point and turn over the presidency in an official, formal and orderly manner to Mike Pence. Highly unusual? Yes, but we have no choice but to be bold.

In leaving after two years, Trump would have the satisfaction of knowing that he won the White House fair and square in 2016. No small accomplishment!

Dan Laurent, Charlotte

Let’s get back to America’s strengths

America is a success not just because we follow laws, but because we were “E Pluribus Unum - Out of Many, One” with belief “In God We Trust.” Our strength came from the melting pot of different races, colors, creeds. We stood for our national anthem, and when our flag passed. We accepted election results. We voted for change as needed. The bedrock on which America stood was that We the People are one people, all with inalienable rights from our Creator. That bedrock is being undermined. We are becoming a bitter stew of warring tribes.

Ed Mesko, Charlotte

Thanks for Marshall Park coverage

In response to “With Marshall Park, put people...” (Aug. 25 Opinion):

Thanks to Candice Langston for her well-researched, articulate and passionate article on Marshall Park and the former Brooklyn community. I’m glad to see Candice lives in Plaza Midwood, my rapidly changing neighborhood. We clearly need her voice here as elsewhere.

Sharon Kugelmass,

Charlotte

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