Letters to the Editor

Observer Forum: Letters to the editor 04.24.15

Daryl Solomonson
Daryl Solomonson

In response to “N.C. out of running for Volvo plant” (April 22):

N.C. politics also a deterrent

It is so easy to blame incentives as the reason North Carolina is losing out on major new businesses.

But there are other reasons we are losing: education reputation, teacher pay, tax increases on retirees, suppression of voter rights, position on gay marriage.

It’s hard to attract today’s businesses with these detractors. As a state, we will continue to lose businesses and those who may want to retire here.

Daryl Solomonson

Troutman

In response to “Bishop cancels event on LGBT issues” (April 23):

Bishop Jugis wrong to stifle dialogue on LGBT issues

It amazes me that an event sponsored by PFLAG Charlotte, a caring nonprofit, and New Ways Ministry, a Catholic organization that promotes social justice, could raise Bishop Peter Jugis’ ire to the extent that he’d expel it from Catholic property.

Why does he think dialogue among adults about love, tolerance, compassion and equality is against the church’s teaching?

I was taught that God’s house should be a place of comfort, a place to explore thought and spirituality, a place of unconditional love.

Somehow that’s not happening here. I wonder how Pope Francis would react if he knew?

Linda Lawyer

Charlotte


In response to “Outerbelt to open by July 20” (April 23):

Took 25 years to build the outerbelt? That’s ridiculous!

I find it mind boggling that a 67-mile loop around the city would take 25 years to complete.

By comparison, the entire New York State Thruway system – a 569-mile stretch of highway that extends from just north of New York City to Buffalo, N.Y., crossing multiple rivers and passing through the Adirondack Mountains – took less than 10 years to complete.

That was almost 60 years ago, when the available construction equipment and technology was far less advanced than today.

David Wolitzky

Charlotte


In response to “Bill would expand wait for abortions” (April 23):

Stop telling women what they can do with their bodies

A waiting period for an abortion only ups the expense. It requires more time off from work and, in the case of women who live far from the fewer and fewer clinics that do such procedures, incurring hotel bills or additional expenses.

Most women who cannot afford to raise a child don’t have that extra money.

It’s outrageous that a few self-righteous individuals have the authority to tell women what we can do with our bodies and our lives.

Linda J. Brooks

Charlotte

Put a surtax on tractor-trailers to help fund roads in N.C.

Tractor-trailers are the major factor in the destruction of N.C. highways. Why not charge all large trucks a surtax like many other states do?

Don’t place the burden on average citizens through higher fees. If the legislature had not robbed the Highway Trust Fund for years to balance the state budget, the fee and tax increases would not be needed.

Chuck Alford

Shelby


Stop building two-lane roads, they’ll just need upgrading

Under no circumstances should the city, county or state ever build another two-lane road.

If there isn’t enough money to build a road with four or more lanes, then don’t build it at all.

The pain caused by the high traffic volume on too-narrow roads, plus the cost of future upgrading, are prices that are far too expensive to pay.

John A. Marszalek

Charlotte


In response to “Don’t further politicize judiciary” (April 19 Viewpoint):

Here’s another reason not to politicize N.C. judicial elections

Attorney John Wester presents a compelling argument against politicizing statewide elections of N.C. judges.

Unfortunately, the purpose of the law is not a serious attempt to elect the best judges, but instead a way to elect politically biased, primarily conservative individuals to serve as judges.

One can already see the TV ad, backed by out-of-state money: “Vote no for (name of candidate) – another Hillary Clinton Liberal. N.C. needs (name of other candidate) for traditional N.C. values in our courtrooms.”

John H. Clark

Charlotte

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