Prisoners on the North Carolina death row make their way back to their cell block  at Central Prison in Raleigh in 2002, not long after a series of reforms began sharply reducing the number of death-penalty cases in the state. A new report by a death penalty advocacy group says most of the death row prisoners would not be there had they been investigated and tried using today’s laws.
Prisoners on the North Carolina death row make their way back to their cell block at Central Prison in Raleigh in 2002, not long after a series of reforms began sharply reducing the number of death-penalty cases in the state. A new report by a death penalty advocacy group says most of the death row prisoners would not be there had they been investigated and tried using today’s laws. Observer file
Prisoners on the North Carolina death row make their way back to their cell block at Central Prison in Raleigh in 2002, not long after a series of reforms began sharply reducing the number of death-penalty cases in the state. A new report by a death penalty advocacy group says most of the death row prisoners would not be there had they been investigated and tried using today’s laws. Observer file