Local & State Voices

An unthinkable veto of an abortion bill

Speaker argues for the House to pass ‘born alive’ abortion bill

Speaker of the NC House encourages members to pass the 'born alive' abortion bill, overriding an earlier veto by Gov. Roy Cooper. The bill would bring new penalties for medical professionals who allow abortion survivors to die.
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Speaker of the NC House encourages members to pass the 'born alive' abortion bill, overriding an earlier veto by Gov. Roy Cooper. The bill would bring new penalties for medical professionals who allow abortion survivors to die.

When Gov. Roy Cooper vetoed the North Carolina’s born alive abortion bill, I was appalled.

It is unthinkable lawmakers would vote to knowingly lay aside an innocent newborn infant, leaving the baby to die. Unfortunately, in North Carolina, the care of a baby born alive must now be left to the abortionist who moments earlier failed to terminate their life.

Thirty-one states currently have laws with specific guidelines mandating abortionists exercise professional skill, care, and diligence to preserve the life and health of the child. In those states, a child born alive must be immediately transported and admitted to a hospital. Having no such law or statute in North Carolina is unacceptable.

Gov. Cooper essentially said murder is already illegal in North Carolina. Others imply the idea babies may be born alive after a botched abortion doesn’t happen. But it’s simply not true. Only a handful of states require records of babies born alive following abortion procedures — proof that it does happen. Florida has recorded 17 cases in the last two years alone.

Undercover investigators have used hidden cameras to record abortionists describe deliberately not providing care for a baby born alive; instead they leave the baby to die. There is even an abortionist who cut the infant’s umbilical cord, placed the living baby in a plastic biohazard bag and threw out the baby, alive at 23 weeks of age. Babies born at 23 weeks survive with proper natal care.



In 2002, the federal Born-Alive Infants Protections Act clarified that if an abortion results in the live birth of an infant, the infant is a legal person for all purposes under U.S. laws, entitled to all the protections of such laws. However, it did not create additional, specific protections for children who survive an abortion, leading states to pass laws to protect babies born alive.

Simply put, this is not an abortion issue; it is an issue of human rights and human decency. This is not an issue for the political talking heads; it is an issue of the moral compass of our culture and society. People from every political perspective agree that allowing a baby to die after a failed abortion attempt is unacceptable and morally reprehensible.

Who are we as a people and a culture if we cannot recognize the inherent sanctity of a living human being? I don’t know anyone who thinks an infant child is not a human being deserving of the rights and protections of any other person. Planned or unplanned should not influence the decision as to whether a child is given the right to live when born alive. Leaving a child born alive to die is infanticide no matter how Gov. Cooper or Democrats in the General Assembly try to rationalize it.

I pray this will not be the end of efforts to fight for the rights and protections to which every person born is worthy. May the citizens of North Carolina never forget the shameful actions of Gov. Cooper and those who stood with him to veto this bill. I hope voters reject these shameful politicians in 2020. There is room among us for disagreements and differences on political and policy positions. Leaving an infant child born alive to die should not be among them.

Contributing columnist Desiree Zapata Miller is president of the Mecklenburg Evening Republican Women’s Club. Email: dzmiller81@gmail.com
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