College Sports

Queens repeats sweep of men’s, women’s DII swim and diving team titles

Flanked by Queens swim coach Jeff Dugdale (center), Royals swimmers Dion Dreesens (left) and Caroline Arakelian (right) hold the men’s and women’s championship trophies from the 2016 NCAA Division II National Championships, held March 9-12, 2016, in Indianapolis, Ind. Queens repeated as men’s and women’s champions, and Dreesens was named the men’s most outstanding swimmer. In addition, Queens swimmer Patricia Castro-Ortega (not pictured) was named the women’s most outstanding swimmer for the second straight year. CREDIT: Bill Kiser/Special to the Observer
Flanked by Queens swim coach Jeff Dugdale (center), Royals swimmers Dion Dreesens (left) and Caroline Arakelian (right) hold the men’s and women’s championship trophies from the 2016 NCAA Division II National Championships, held March 9-12, 2016, in Indianapolis, Ind. Queens repeated as men’s and women’s champions, and Dreesens was named the men’s most outstanding swimmer. In addition, Queens swimmer Patricia Castro-Ortega (not pictured) was named the women’s most outstanding swimmer for the second straight year. CREDIT: Bill Kiser/Special to the Observer

Even before the season began, Queens swim coach Jeff Dugdale didn’t want his swimmers to think about last year’s NCAA titles or what it took to win it.

Instead, Dugdale asked his swimmers and even assistant coaches, in essence, to forget it happened.

“We purposely didn’t say we were going to defend our title,” Dugdale said. “We were getting ready to compete for another one. We didn’t want to hear that ‘streak’ stuff.

“We came up with a little mantra – ‘What got us here, won’t get us there.’ 

That approach led the Royals to repeat their sweep of the men’s and women’s team titles at the 2016 NCAA Division II national swimming and diving championships, held March 9-12 in Indianapolis.

Queens’ men won six events and finished the four-day meet with 449 points, 66.5 points ahead of Lindenwood (382.5). The Royals’ women were even more dominant, winning seven events and scoring 567 points, 202.5 points ahead of South Atlantic Conference rival Wingate (364.5).

“We wanted to get to 600 (points),” said Dugdale, who was also named the D-II men’s coach of the year for the second time. “We fell just short.”

Queens swimmers also swept the D-II nationals’ major individual awards for the second straight year.

Dion Dreesens was named the men’s most outstanding swimmer after winning four gold medals (three individual, one relay). He won the men’s 200-, 500- and 1,000-yard freestyle, setting NCAA records in the 200 and 500, and was part of the Royals’ record-setting 800-yard freestyle relay team.

“We still had to fight for it, but I didn’t feel that much pressure,” said Dreesens, who swam for the Netherlands in the 2012 London Olympic Games. “It was more fun just racing.”

Patricia Castro-Ortega repeated as the women’s most outstanding swimmer after winning six gold medals (four individual, two relay). She set NCAA records in winning the women’s 200- and 400-yard individual medley and 100- and 500-yard freestyle events, and was on the Royals’ winning 400- and 800-yard freestyle relay teams.

Also winning gold medals for Queens were Caroline Arakelian (women’s 400 and 800 freestyle relay), Nicholas Arakelian (men’s 400 individual medley and 800 freestyle relay), Hannah Peiffer (women’s 100-yard backstroke), Zachary Phelps (men’s 200-yard backstroke), Ben Taylor and Parker Cook-Weeks (both men’s 800 freestyle relay), Josefina Lorda-Taylor and McKenzie Stevens (both women’s 800 freestyle relay), and Kyrie Dobson and Shelly Prayson (both women’s 400 freestyle relay).

“By not saying we were going to defend our titles, it kinda took any pressure off,” said Caroline Arakelian, who ended her swimming career at Queens with five NCAA championship gold medals.

“We couldn’t do what we did last year and expect to win again. We had to do more than what we did last year.”

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