High School Sports

East Meck's glory goes on

The last time Malik Stith and Titus Robinson took to the basketball court for an official game, they helped East Mecklenburg High win its first state championship in decades.

Next week, the duo could get one last chance to show that they are indeed two of the best in the state.

Stith and Robinson will represent the western side of the state in the N.C. East-West All-Star basketball game. East Meck is the only school with two players in the game, which invites the top players from the 2008 class. The men's game follows the women's 6:30 p.m. game July 21 at the Greensboro Coliseum.

“As a coach, it's extremely prideful to have two players on the roster,” said East Meck coach Jason Grube. “I'm excited for the kids because they deserved it.”

Stith, a 5-foot-11 guard, and Robinson, a 6-7 forward, both earned all-state spots after the season. Robinson was also named the most valuable player of the championship game, a 72-63 win over Apex.

Already training and taking classes at the University at Buffalo, Robinson's petitioning the Buffalo coaching staff and faculty to let him return to play in the All-Star game.

“It will be the last game I play in N.C., maybe,” he said.

With coaches already stressing work in the weight room, Robinson has also caught glimpses in team scrimmages of what Division-I basketball will look like when the season starts.

“The game speed is a lot faster than what it was in high school,” he said. “You get someone back in Charlotte where 6-6 is the biggest, and they can't move very fast.”

For Stith, the Southwestern 4A Player of the Year, the fall will be spent gaining range on his jump shot and improving his grades at Maine's Bridgton Academy before heading to St. John's University.

After averaging 16 points, eight assists and six rebounds per game, Stith had offers from colleges, Grube said. His academics, though, limited his options.

“Physically, there were schools that were interested in him right now, but he wasn't as focused as he needed to be when he was younger,” Grube said.

As for the All-Star game, where players often look to get stats and put on a show, the two have kept East Meck's team-first attitude.

“(Stith and Robinson) told me after a few practices, ‘These guys don't get it, and they don't pass enough,'” Grube said. “These two want to win.

“They're not just out there to have fun.”

The last time Malik Stith and Titus Robinson took to the basketball court for an official game, they helped East Mecklenburg High win its first state championship in decades.

Next week, the duo could get one last chance to show that they are indeed two of the best in the state.

Stith and Robinson will represent the western side of the state in the N.C. East-West All-Star basketball game. East Meck is the only school with two players in the game, which invites the top players from the 2008 class. The men's game follows the women's 6:30 p.m. game July 21 at the Greensboro Coliseum.

“As a coach, it's extremely prideful to have two players on the roster,” said East Meck coach Jason Grube. “I'm excited for the kids because they deserved it.”

Stith, a 5-foot-11 guard, and Robinson, a 6-7 forward, both earned all-state spots after the season. Robinson was also named the most valuable player of the championship game, a 72-63 win over Apex.

Already training and taking classes at the University at Buffalo, Robinson's petitioning the Buffalo coaching staff and faculty to let him return to play in the All-Star game.

“It will be the last game I play in N.C., maybe,” he said.

With coaches already stressing work in the weight room, Robinson has also caught glimpses in team scrimmages of what Division-I basketball will look like when the season starts.

“The game speed is a lot faster than what it was in high school,” he said. “You get someone back in Charlotte where 6-6 is the biggest, and they can't move very fast.”

For Stith, the Southwestern 4A Player of the Year, the fall will be spent gaining range on his jump shot and improving his grades at Maine's Bridgton Academy before heading to St. John's University.

After averaging 16 points, eight assists and six rebounds per game, Stith had offers from colleges, Grube said. His academics, though, limited his options.

“Physically, there were schools that were interested in him right now, but he wasn't as focused as he needed to be when he was younger,” Grube said.

As for the All-Star game, where players often look to get stats and put on a show, the two have kept East Meck's team-first attitude.

“(Stith and Robinson) told me after a few practices, ‘These guys don't get it, and they don't pass enough,'” Grube said. “These two want to win.

“They're not just out there to have fun.”

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