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NASCAR updates rulebook for driver-behavior penalties

Sounds from the NASCAR Xfinity Series garage

The NASCAR Xfinity Series garage provided a range of sound Friday morning as team's prepared for practice and made adjustments and repairs to their cars.
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The NASCAR Xfinity Series garage provided a range of sound Friday morning as team's prepared for practice and made adjustments and repairs to their cars.

NASCAR updated its rule book Friday to include specific penalties for driver behavior.

The rule book now includes clauses that include points deductions, fines and suspensions for various infractions, from verbally disparaging NASCAR to intentionally wrecking a driver who is in championship contention during the Chase.

That infraction – which would come with a loss of 50-100 championship points, a fine of $150,000-$200,000 and a two-race suspension or termination – appears to be in reaction to a similar situation during last season’s Chase, when noncontender Matt Kenseth wrecked Joey Logano at Martinsville (Va.) Speedway.

Kenseth was suspended two races and placed on six months probation (later reduced to probation through Dec. 31, 2015).

Five “member actions” are outlined in Section 12.8.1 of NASCAR’s rulebook:

▪ Heat-of-the-moment encounters that do not include physical violence (resulting in a meeting, warning or probation).

▪ Verbally disparaging NASCAR or the media, intentionally damaging a vehicle under yellow or red conditions or on pit road with no one around ($10,000-$50,000 fine or probation).

▪ Physical confrontations, attempting to manipulate the outcome of a race or intentionally wrecking another vehicle (25-50 points, $50,000-$100,000 fine, one-race suspension or termination).

▪ Targeting a driver in vulnerable position, intentionally removing a driver in championship contention in a dangerous manner (50-100 points, $150,000-$200,000 fine, two-race suspension).

▪ Public disparagement of another person based on race, color, creed, national origin, etc.; charged or convicted of criminal violations, including domestic violence, trafficking or assault (fine, suspension or termination).

 
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