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  • Ferrell family responds to mistrial

    After four days of deliberations, a mistrial was declared Friday when the jury was unable to resolve a deadlock in the case of Randall “Wes” Kerrick, a Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer accused of killing an unarmed man in a struggle two years ago. Eight jurors were for acquittal, four for conviction, according to someone close to the proceedings. Video by T.Ortega Gaines

After four days of deliberations, a mistrial was declared Friday when the jury was unable to resolve a deadlock in the case of Randall “Wes” Kerrick, a Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer accused of killing an unarmed man in a struggle two years ago. Eight jurors were for acquittal, four for conviction, according to someone close to the proceedings. Video by T.Ortega Gaines
After four days of deliberations, a mistrial was declared Friday when the jury was unable to resolve a deadlock in the case of Randall “Wes” Kerrick, a Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer accused of killing an unarmed man in a struggle two years ago. Eight jurors were for acquittal, four for conviction, according to someone close to the proceedings. Video by T.Ortega Gaines

Ferrell family vows to fight on, calls for new trial

August 21, 2015 9:04 PM

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  • Jail visitation by video "is more secure"

    Mecklenburg County Sheriff's office says the new system is more secure and provides ease of use. Inmate's rights advocates say face-to-face visits, even through glass, provide a connection that video can't.