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When does Daylight Saving Time end?

Daylight Saving Time ends at 2 a.m. Sunday, so be sure to set your clocks back an hour before you go to bed. Let the darkness begin.
Daylight Saving Time ends at 2 a.m. Sunday, so be sure to set your clocks back an hour before you go to bed. Let the darkness begin. MCT file illustration

Ready for that one-morning-a-year extra hour of sleep?

Daylight Saving Time ends at 2 a.m. Sunday, so be sure to set your clocks back an hour before you go to bed.

Of course we get more light in the morning, but is anybody really happy about this? Happy about, say, getting depressed again?

Losing an hour of afternoon daylight after setting the clocks back to standard time can trigger mental illness, including bipolar disorder, and seasonal affective disorder, also known as winter depression, according to TimeandDate.com.

The website mentions a Danish study that found an 11-percent increase in depression cases after the time seasonal change. Oh, but the good news: The cases “dissipated gradually” after only 10 weeks!

An Australian study, meanwhile, found that male suicide rates increased the days after both the spring and fall Daylight Saving Time shift.

There’s more: You have to be extra vigilant on the roads come Sunday.

In North Carolina, November traditionally averages more crashes than any other month, according to the state Department of Transportation.

Driving either just before sunrise or immediately at dusk are the most dangerous times, with traffic fatalities three times more likely, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports.

A key problem is that while the sky is still lit, the roads begin to get dark. That causes a disparity between light and dark, which creates vision problems for some drivers, state transportation officials tell us each year.

Glare from the rising or setting sun, and from headlights in the darkened afternoon, poses another problem, as it reduces the ability to see clearly.

Glare can increase a driver’s reaction time because of its three- to five-second effect on vision, which may cause drivers to suddenly slow down or drift in their lane, according to the state DOT.

Joe Marusak: 704-358-5067, @jmarusak

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