Elections

Where do I vote? When can I vote? And what’s on the ballot in North Carolina?

Five things you need to know to vote in November

The 2018 mid-term election will include federal, state and local offices, along with six amendments the legislature wants on the ballot. Here's what you need to know to vote.
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The 2018 mid-term election will include federal, state and local offices, along with six amendments the legislature wants on the ballot. Here's what you need to know to vote.

More than 2 million North Carolinians have already cast their ballots in the midterm elections. The state’s remaining 5 million registered voters get their chance Tuesday.

They’ll head to the polls under cloudy, rainy skies, with the National Weather Service forecasting a 60 percent chance of precipitation in Charlotte and a chance of thunderstorms.

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Here are some key things to know as you head to the polls:

When can I vote?

The polls are open from 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. statewide in North Carolina. Lines are typically longest before and after business hours, according to the N.C. Board of Elections. Procrastinator? If you’re in line by 7:30 p.m., you’ll be able to cast a ballot.

What’s on the ballot?

There aren’t any statewide offices up for grabs this year. But voters in some congressional races — the 9th District seat in southeast Charlotte and Union County, the 13th District north and east of Charlotte — will elect representatives who will help determine whether or not Democrats win enough seats to retake control of the U.S. House. State legislators are also on the ballot, as Democrats try to “break the supermajority” Republicans hold in the N.C. General Assembly. Mecklenburg County commissioners are on the ballot, as is $223 million worth of borrowing the city of Charlotte wants to use for roads, housing and infrastructure.

When will we know who won?

Results should start coming in within half an hour of the polls closing at 7:30 p.m., with early voting results posting first. But it could be a long night, as some of the races are expected to be very close. That’s true of the 9th District congressional race, which polls have shown in a dead heat. Election watchers could be waiting hours for every precinct to report and make the final result clear. Results will post online at https://er.ncsbe.gov.

Where do I vote?

Unlike early voting, where voters can cast a ballot at any open polling location in the county, you have to vote at your assigned precinct Tuesday. If you don’t know where that is, you can look up your precinct online at www.meckboe.org.

What if I have a problem voting?

If you have an issue on Election Day, you can report it to the state Board of Elections at https://www.ncsbe.gov. Look for “Report an Election Incident” on the home page.

Portillo: 704-358-5041
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