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A pair of North Atlantic mako sharks tagged by researchers studying their migratory patterns seem to have an affinity for each other — and, lately, the Carolinas coast. Researchers at the Guy Harvey Research Institute at Nova Southeastern University have found makos make extremely long journeys. The two sharks now hanging off the Carolinas, named Bruce and Matt J. after their tag sponsors, were captured together 10 months ago near Ocean City, Md. Since then, each has swum more than 4,000 miles, mostly off the northern East Coast. Now, however, they have turned south and have wound up very close together. For more, visit http://bit.ly/MakoNews031716. Guy Harvey Research Institute
A pair of North Atlantic mako sharks tagged by researchers studying their migratory patterns seem to have an affinity for each other — and, lately, the Carolinas coast. Researchers at the Guy Harvey Research Institute at Nova Southeastern University have found makos make extremely long journeys. The two sharks now hanging off the Carolinas, named Bruce and Matt J. after their tag sponsors, were captured together 10 months ago near Ocean City, Md. Since then, each has swum more than 4,000 miles, mostly off the northern East Coast. Now, however, they have turned south and have wound up very close together. For more, visit http://bit.ly/MakoNews031716. Guy Harvey Research Institute

A 255-lb ‘apex predator’ mako shark is lingering off NC’s Outer Banks

February 07, 2018 06:17 AM

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